Save £2.00 when you fill up your tank, today only!

417 Comments | Add Comment | Blog entry posted 31st December, 2010

Garages across the UK are set to hike the price of filling up a tank of fuel, already at record highs, by a further £2.00 per tank tomorrow.

These New Year price rises as a result of the hike in VAT from 17.5% to 20% combined with a planned duty rise will see an extra 4p being added to prices per litre to motor fuel.

Petrol and Diesel drivers will both be affected by the moves.

Not only have we seen this massive one off hike in the tax on fuel but it has hit us all at a time when the price of oil has been on the rise too. Oil now seems to have settled above 90 USD per barrel compared to highs of 80 USD through most of 2010.

As a PetrolPrices.com member as long as you are using our daily emails or our iPhone App you should be used to saving £2 per fill up anyway but we wanted to give you a heads up so that you can save on this planned rise.

Please tell us how this is affecting you. Have you had to change your driving habits? Are you expecting 2011 to be worse than 2010 for running your car? Do you think we should use the tax from fuel to help better prepare our roads for snow?

Replies to Save £2.00 when you fill up your tank, today only!

Earl de Michel February 25, 2013

report reply to Earl de Michel

They claimed fuel has gone up by 6.24p per litre, but at the pumps it is showing around 8-10p increase - are the garages making the profit???

Joseph October 10, 2012

report reply to Joseph

I am amazed that my Honda Civic, automatic, can only give me about 26 mpg driving round the town. The area has many hills, however, the mileage is very poor. Anyone know how to increase the mileage?

dennis robbins September 26, 2012

report reply to dennis robbins

To comply with emission standards I now drive a 5 year old peugeot 107, 61.4 mpg £20 road tax a year as it is a small engine with 3 cylinders. I have recently had a 10000 mile service and had it filled with Magnatec Oil to get what the Manufacturers claim to be best for my car and am about to start using Esso's Fuel Energy Unleaded 97 again to improve engine cleaning and Mpg. I have been advised not to use the additives I used to use as this overheats the catalytic convertor and could shorten the convertors life, I want to use the best I can get for my car, if anyone out there has any sensible suggestions I would like to hear them.

William Guy Bradshaw March 23, 2012

report reply to William Guy Bradshaw

I now drive a Suzuki Jimny 1.3 and as its not a speed machine I find I drive more like a very mature Sunday driver type. Speeding off at every set of lights when you will have to slam all on when you reach the next set just uses fuel!

Joseph Earing February 29, 2012

report reply to Joseph Earing

The day's of motoring I believe are numbered,I have been forced know to sell my motorhome, which I enjoyed many weekends away, spending money at local shops and tourist attraction's,this will know stop.It will have a knock on effect.
There will come a point when petrol is so expensive it won't sell.Some say it could be £2.00 a litr next year or sooner.

Melville K Jones February 15, 2012

report reply to Melville K Jones

Have you seen the e-mail circulating at the moment? Someone has worked out a few comparisons. e.g.
Evian (Naive spelt backwards) Water sells at £1.49 per 9 oz bottle = 21.19 per gall - for water and the buyer doesn't know the source of it! and Printer ink - wait for it - £5,200.00 per gall. Loads of other examples of such rip off prices. So, is Petrol that overpriced? Yes, I agree really, it is.

    Joseph Earing February 29, 2012

    report reply to Joseph Earing

    Yes but a bit cold,get a citreon ci or similer 999cc get around 61 to the gallon,and it's wormer.

      Russ Uridge March 3, 2012

      report reply to Russ Uridge

      I have to say, I bought a new Ford fiesta econetic back in 2010 when prices were roughly 90p per litre. The sales guy at Ford was trying to twist my arm into buying a zetec for the same price citing that fuel prices won't ever go up, they were at there highest.
      Now in the £1.40's I'm glad I did. I get roughly 100miles per £10 (give or take ten miles).
      My other half drives a Saab, and she gets about 40 miles per £10...
      Tragically the saab spends most of it's time parked up.
      Econetic for me was affordable, (as opposed to the electric/petrol super expensive ones) and better still.... the road tax is absolutely £0. because the emissions come in at 98g co2 per km.

nigel November 29, 2011

report reply to nigel

cant afford to drive now ,train fairs unafordable ,bus fares unafordable ,what next

    Anthony Dryden December 23, 2012

    report reply to Anthony Dryden

    Hi Mathew
    I'm afraid you are VERY wrong, the cost of fuel is very much under control, but sadly for us it's the government + supermarkets that are in control.
    Tony

Phoenix August 31, 2011

report reply to Phoenix

Petrol prices are completely out of control now, they really need to be dropped.

Peter July 10, 2011

report reply to Peter

So it won't run out for the deluded or for 3 year olds then?

Kellerman July 6, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

Re: Michael:

>Peak oil isnt a theory based on observation , nor does it take into account >new supply/demand and technological/economical factors that develop.

So, basically, technology will make a finite resource infinite?

And I assure you, it IS based on observation. Kindly look at Texas, Indonesia, the North Sea and you’ll see a trend. Hint: it’s decline regardless of technological innovation or expense.

Read up on secondary and enhanced oil recovery techniques. When utilised, they enable an old field to get a spurt in output again (this is seen in many North Sea and Texan fields). However, horizontal drilling and water or CO2 injection only delay the inevitable. Sooner or later, the water or gas level hits the wellhead, and then you start getting more water with a hint of oil than actual oil.

>You analogy is ill fitting also, as beer is man made. Many of Hubberts >colleague's always said he drew the graph first and selected data that fit. >How many times has the peak been revised? CERA recently reported peak >oil in 2030? If any other scientific theory had been revised so many times, it >would be a laughing stock however "big oil" continue to invest money in >"educating" people about peak oil as it suits there cause, higher oil prices.

Spoke like a true acolyte of CERA, and one who as never looked at BP’s statistical data or even that of the normally Pollyanna-esque IEA and EIA. Tell me, can you give me a source for your accusations (you know, the ones that make Hubbert out to be a hack, one revered as one of the greatest geologists of the 20th century)? Just curious.

By the way, I’d not put much credence in CERA.

Link 1: goo.gl/gPNFn

Woops!

Link 2: goo.gl/gPNFn

Double woops!

But I guess even a broken clock is right twice a day. But by all means, keep peddaling the conspiracy theory that it’s all Big Oil (we’ll ignore the fact that it clashes with the very idea of oil companies given if they admit peak oil, as the likes of ExxonMobil’s Rex Tillerson are keen not to, then it means they’re out of a job). Yeah, sure. My product is running out, but please, keep buying it. No, don’t go and talk to the solar panel dealer and stop ogling the nuclear power lady.


>It doesnt take into account improving shale method extraction, the 3 trillion >cubic feet of natural gas under the yukon, Continous deep sea field >discoveries, Offshore production is increasing, and the industry may soon be >asked to reconsider its basic assumptions about oil. Over the past few >decades, a number of industry experts and geologists have conducted >research suggesting that the origin of hydrocarbons may be abiogenic, not >organic. Stated simply, the abiogenic oil theory posits that oil is not formed >from plants and animals compressed for millions of years in sediment rock.
>Instead, oil is a primordial substance created before the formation of Earth, >and found deep underground

>Read about abiogenic petroleum origin theory and the number of top >experts in the field of hydrocarbon research flocking to support the theory.

>Maybe Kellerman, if you understood the laws of physics you may be able to >comment on them however your unscientifically based leftish sarcasm gives >of the impression of a complete void between your ears.

Oil shale isn’t ramping up to 85 Mbpd any time soon (by the way, the correct term is oil sands given the consistency). Even Shell realise this. Do yourself a favour and look at global demand, then look at the last ten years of stellar growth in oil sands. Assuming we don’t pollute the planet to hell first, it still won’t be anything but a drop in the bucket. The US alone uses more per day than any oil sands project has ever managed. I’m sure that’s great for those rich Americans.

Natural gas? Really? And I imagine you’ll tell me when all 7 billion people are using it to heat their homes, power their gadgets as well as run their cars, that the 40 years worth that the US and Russia have will last us another century.

And abiogenic oil is snake oil for people who failed organic chemistry. Tell me how many oil wells magically started filling up again, and for each one, I’ll give you a grand.

Here is a good rebuttal:

===

The fact remains that the abiotic theory of petroleum genesis has zero credibility for economically interesting accumulations. 99.9999% of the world's liquid hydrocarbons are produced by maturation of organic matter derived from organisms. To deny this means you have to come up with good explanations for the following observations.
The almost universal association of petroleum with sedimentary rocks.
The close link between petroleum reservoirs and source rocks as shown by biomarkers (the source rocks contain the same organic markers as the petroleum, essentially chemically fingerprinting the two).
The consistent variation of biomarkers in petroleum in accordance with the history of life on earth (biomarkers indicative of land plants are found only in Devonian and younger rocks, that formed by marine plankton only in Neoproterozoic and younger rocks, the oldest oils containing only biomarkers of bacteria).
The close link between the biomarkers in source rock and depositional environment (source rocks containing biomarkers of land plants are found only in terrestrial and shallow marine sediments, those indicating marine conditions only in marine sediments, those from hypersaline lakes containing only bacterial biomarkers).
Progressive destruction of oil when heated to over 100 degrees (precluding formation and/or migration at high temperatures as implied by the abiogenic postulate).
The generation of petroleum from kerogen on heating in the laboratory (complete with biomarkers), as suggested by the biogenic theory.
The strong enrichment in C12 of petroleum indicative of biological fractionation (no inorganic process can cause anything like the fractionation of light carbon that is seen in petroleum).
The location of petroleum reservoirs down the hydraulic gradient from the source rocks in many cases (those which are not are in areas where there is clear evidence of post migration tectonism).

8 ) The almost complete absence of significant petroleum occurrences in igneous and metamorphic rocks (the rare exceptions discussed below).
The evidence usually cited in favour of abiogenic petroleum can all be better explained by the biogenic hypothesis e.g.:

Rare traces of cooked pyrobitumens in igneous rocks (better explained by reaction with organic rich country rocks, with which the pyrobitumens can usually be tied).
Rare traces of cooked pyrobitumens in metamorphic rocks (better explained by metamorphism of residual hydrocarbons in the protolith).
The very rare occurrence of small hydrocarbon accumulations in igneous or metamorphic rocks (in every case these are adjacent to organic rich sedimentary rocks to which the hydrocarbons can be tied via biomarkers).
The presence of undoubted mantle derived gases (such as He and some CO2) in some natural gas (there is no reason why gas accumulations must be all from one source, given that some petroleum fields are of mixed provenance it is inevitable that some mantle gas contamination of biogenic hydrocarbons will occur under some circumstances).
The presence of traces of hydrocarbons in deep wells in crystalline rock (these can be formed by a range of processes, including metamorphic synthesis by the fischer-tropsch reaction, or from residual organic matter as in 10).
Traces of hydrocarbon gases in magma volatiles (in most cases magmas ascend through sedimentary succession, any organic matter present will be thermally cracked and some will be incorporated into the volatile phase, some fischer-tropsch synthesis can also occur).

Traces of hydrocarbon gases at mid ocean ridges (such traces are not surprising given that the upper mantle has been contaminated with biogenic organic matter through several billion years of subduction, the answer to 14 may be applicable also).

The geological evidence is utterly against the abiogenic postulate.

===

Additionally, it's pretty funny seeing you add the "leftist" moniker to my little condemnation of someone shouting down an idea they dislike. How... rightist of you? If it's liberal to use science (since I am a biologist), then call me a bleeding heart commie if you like.

I'll wear that badge with pride, since it appears there are those who show their ignorance with pride.

Re: Kenedy:

I don't see what you're getting at. Are you saying PP.com is biased in that it also supports the theory of gravity too? I dare say you'll have a time convincing me that a website will censor those because it has a bias towards reality. If it was political, yes, but you're only entitled to your own opinions. Not your own facts.

Unless you'd like to prove how something finite can last forever. I'd really like to see that, because that's what the alternative is to peak oil which so few here seem to grasp. The mechanics of how we get there are irrelevant. It WILL run out one way or another, unless you're deluded or 3-years-old.

Kenedy July 3, 2011

report reply to Kenedy

It seems that "PetrolPrices.com" are now supporting the "Peak Oil theory" 100% and there's me thinking they were strictly impartial. It wasn't too long ago that they removed old Peakies continual copy/paste propaganda but now they're promoting it with gusto. Talk about running with the fox AND the hounds.

How long before: "This comment has been removed as it was found to be in breach of our Blog Policies" takes the place of the truth?

Moles July 2, 2011

report reply to Moles

Why such a difference between price of petrol from the same brand ..Sainsburys where I live in worthing 1.34 sainsburys hove 8 miles away 1.31

BP 1.35 here yet few miles away 132.



Tesco 1.33 Tesco hove 1.30
The price should be the same wherever you live


Still being ripped off and still nothing is being done about it!!!

Mitchell June 30, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Peak oil isnt a theory based on observation , nor does it take into account new supply/demand and technological/economical factors that develop. You analogy is ill fitting also, as beer is man made. Many of Hubberts colleague's always said he drew the graph first and selected data that fit. How many times has the peak been revised? CERA recently reported peak oil in 2030? If any other scientific theory had been revised so many times, it would be a laughing stock however "big oil" continue to invest money in "educating" people about peak oil as it suits there cause, higher oil prices.

It doesnt take into account improving shale method extraction, the 3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas under the yukon, Continous deep sea field discoveries, Offshore production is increasing, and the industry may soon be asked to reconsider its basic assumptions about oil. Over the past few decades, a number of industry experts and geologists have conducted research suggesting that the origin of hydrocarbons may be abiogenic, not organic. Stated simply, the abiogenic oil theory posits that oil is not formed from plants and animals compressed for millions of years in sediment rock.
Instead, oil is a primordial substance created before the formation of Earth, and found deep underground

Read about abiogenic petroleum origin theory and the number of top experts in the field of hydrocarbon research flocking to support the theory.

Maybe Kellerman, if you understood the laws of physics you may be able to comment on them however your unscientifically based leftish sarcasm gives of the impression of a complete void between your ears.

Rodders68 June 30, 2011

report reply to Rodders68

can anyone explain why diesel at our local morrisons, is 4p dearer than the same store 8 miles away?
seems like a rip off to me.

Kellerman June 30, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

Also, LOL at the Greenpeace magazine comment. Did you seriously just state The Economist is a lefty, hippie rag? What're you smoking, and where can I get some?

Kellerman June 30, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

How, exactly, does peak oil become an "outdated theory" in any sense of the word when it posits what isn't infinite can run out? When I go to the pub, I tend to find my beer doesn't self-replenish (well, not without heckling the missus/friends), so I'm at a loss to explain why oil is somehow exempt from the laws of physics.

Danny Harrison June 22, 2011

report reply to Danny Harrison

It's true, I've seen it. Probably up there with my favourites (Samuel L & the small one from Boyzone)

Kenedy June 22, 2011

report reply to Kenedy

#419.
Put the tweezers away.
Self praise is no recommendation.

Mitchell May 25, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Bob , you are not taking into account exchange rate fluctuations.

The $ is very strong at the moment, also prices dont directly track oil prices and will only change at the forecourt when their tanks empty of their previously bought more expensive fuel.

Oil prices are down $14 on 3 weeks ago however the diesel price should only be down about 3pence due to recent fall in the value of the £ against the $.

Bob May 23, 2011

report reply to Bob

When oil price per barrel was approx 136 usd, the price of diesel was 1.429p per litre. I have seen somewhere that for every 3usd increase/decrease in the price per barrel the retail price per litre sould be adjusted by 1p per litre. Why then with the price per barrell (on BBC ceefax page 246) at 109usd has the price per litre not gone down to 1.339p per litre, ie a reduction in the price per barrell of 27usd divided by 3 = 9p less per litre. Prices were adjusted quick enough when costs increased but never seem to be reduced quite as quickly. The cheapest i can find for diesel are ASDA at 1.369

Mitchell May 20, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Get an lpg conversion, will easily pay itself back inside 5-6 months , and from then on your paying 70 p a litre.

K.c.b May 19, 2011

report reply to K.c.b

#406:
And you'd be reading a petrol prices blog for what reason exactly?
A 100% dedicated cyclist? who NEVER travels in/on anything with an internal combustion engine? If you don't play the game, DON'T make the rules.
How are we to carry our partners and children around, maybe on a push bike with a sidecar attached? Now there's a thought (not).

Paul May 18, 2011

report reply to Paul

I'm a cyclist and wish they'd put the price of petrol up so there would be fewer drivers on the road!

Peter May 16, 2011

report reply to Peter

403, when did you last have the fuel gauge in your car calibrated by weights and measures? You haven't. It wasn't calibrated by W&M when it came out of the factory. Your car does not stop as soon as your beloved computer reads 0 miles and the top half of the tank often seems to last longer than the bottom. The gauge in your car is a rough guide, the gauge on a forecourt fuel pump is calibrated, sealed and accurate to within millilitres.

Steve The Poor Garage Owner May 16, 2011

report reply to Steve The Poor Garage Owner

#403#
What a load of rubbish
All petrol pump meters are regularly checked by the local Trading standards. The meters are then sealed by trading standards using a tamper proof seal.

If the metering is subsequently tampered with the seal will break. It is then illegal to dispense from that pump until the unit has been re-calibrated and re-sealed by Trading Standards. If that garage has been dispensing from an un-metered pump they will be heavily fined and could also lose their licence.

All my pumps have notices on them from Trading standards stating that they have been correctly calibrated . They also have T.S telephone number on them in case of a complaint.

If you feel that what you say is true then report that Garage to T.S.

Jimmy Steele May 15, 2011

report reply to Jimmy Steele

Where there’s money there’s crime, and don’t tell me that fuel pump calibration equipment is tamper proof, there’s enough money in fuel now to pay the best criminal minds on the planet. If banks can fraudulently sell PPI to customers, then garages can tweak fuel pump calibrations!

There is plenty of talk about people being financially crippled by the continuing increase of fuel prices, yet very little talk about people having money stolen directly from them by the fraudulent calibration of fuel pumps.
How many of you have noticed that you are spending around the same amount to fill up your vehicle when it is nearly quarter full as you are when it is even bone dry? And the price of the fuel is the same or in some cases even cheaper.
It happens to me on a regular basis as I do around 600 miles per week and when I tell people; they say that they experience the same thing, yet what can we do about it?

For example, my car is bone dry, the fuel warning light on, 4 miles to go on the computer screen, I fill up at 134.9, and it costs me £72. A few days later I have a long journey planned, so I want to fill up, and my car is then just under quarter full, 89 miles left on the computer screen, I see a garage at 133.9, “hooray it’s a penny cheaper”, so I fill up, and it still costs me £68. What, How, Why???
Obviously I immediately speak to the garage manager and accuse them of tampering with the pump calibrations. What else can it be, lets face it, if a garage tweaks the pumps say even 5p per litre and they have 400 cars per day going through 200 garages, it’s big money. I personally think it is more around 30p per litre at some garages.
It would be interesting to do a survey to see how many people feel they are not actually getting the amount of fuel that they are paying for or the pump/receipt tells them they are getting.
How many people would actually siphon off their tank to measure how much fuel they are really getting? Not many, if any at all!
There ought to be a telephone number displayed at each garage that you can call immediately you leave a garage where you know you have been completely ripped’ to make a complaint, and in fact it should be 999, lets face it, in any other theft situation you would call 999, but having said that the police authorities are too busy calibrating the speed cameras, but that’s another subject.
What the hell, lets open that one up for debate also. Have you ever been issued a speeding ticket for just over 30mph when you know you were doing just under as you had slowed down when you saw the camera?
Can we ever beat these legalised extortionists? NEVER!

M. May 11, 2011

report reply to M.

"DERV is falling while Unleaded is rocketing"

Yes this is very much the case in the last couple of days, in fact today and yesterday Diesel is cheaper than unl on platts.

Andy May 11, 2011

report reply to Andy

400

Heaps of movement on the markets, plenty of opportunity to make money but all at very high risk. As we have seen this last couple weeks in can drop or rise 10% in a day. Very volatile at the minute. Are we gonna see QE3 is the big question

Mitchell May 10, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

I think we are about to see some volatile months ahead. Goldman Sachs commenting that oil will correct lower in the short term and rebound above this years highs in the longer term. Gas Oil futures and Crude futures seem to not corelate at the moment, DERV is falling while Unleaded is rocketing.

Goldman are trimming positions while credit suisse believes the correction reperesents a buying opportunity. Will be interesting to see the hedge fund positions when they are published.

I think it would take a madman to put any kind of money into this market at the moment.

Kevin Neil May 10, 2011

report reply to Kevin Neil

when will you help drivers of diesel cars save even more money and help the environment by listing all the biodiesel outlets and prices?

Andy May 9, 2011

report reply to Andy

Very interesting things happening on the futures market at the minute. Seems very very volatile. Somebodies playing with huge sums to get those sort of fluctuations. Something big on the horizon. Or are they just getting itchy feet with QE2 coming to and end next month. QE3 too the rescue??

Son Of Peak May 6, 2011

report reply to Son Of Peak


Despite high prices, crude oil production has stayed basically flat for roughly five years. It seems this is the all-time high-water mark, according to Fatih Birol, chief economist for the International Energy Agency. “We think that crude oil production for the world has already peaked in 2006,” he told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. “I think it would have been better if the governments have started to work on it at least 10 years ago.”

At a European Parliament conference on peak oil, the European Commission’s director-general for transport and mobility policy warned if actions are delayed to reduce oil dependency, “we may be forced to drastically reduce all our mobility.”

Already, rising energy costs are taking their toll around the world, with U.S. economic growth stumbling and raising the spectre of stagflation, as well as, helping to drive up food prices in Latin America, and driving inflation in Europe.

Andy May 5, 2011

report reply to Andy

Very interesting, markets down and commodities way down. Are we seeing the demand destruction really taking hold now. Saudis cut in production looks to have been a well informed decision. I think they need oil prices to stay up around $90 to satisfy their increasingly restless population. If it drops below that then i guess we are all in trouble.

Focus goes into adminstration.......not enough people doing up their devaluing houses?

Mitchell May 5, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Seems things have quietened down in the last few weeks , crude not moving too much , however refined products taking a battering which is nice for the pump price, even though im skeptical whether joe public will see the full extent of the drops.


I dont think China can continue at its current rates, yesterday the central bank again hinted at yet another interest rate rise to "mop up excess cash" which will cool things massively. However India is a concern , their capacity for growth is bigger than china , whether they can handle it sustainably is another kettle of fish.

Andy May 5, 2011

report reply to Andy

Saw a very interesting chart yesterday about net exports. It would seem that even though we may not have hit peak oil it would seem that available exports have peaked. It also stated that if China and Indias consumption rates continued to increase at their current rates they would be consuming 100% of net exports by 2025. Something has to give soon if that is the case.

Any body any views on this?

Mitchell May 4, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

There is no assumption we are paying more than europe for our fuel than europe.

Taking into account exchange rates we have the 11th highest unleaded in europe, however because we are one of the few countries who equally tax diesel , it means our diesel price is the 2nd highest.

Tax needs to be dropped on diesel, unleaded for the most part is a luxury not used in industry.

Melvin W. May 4, 2011

report reply to Melvin W.

The assumption that we are paying more for our fuel than mainland Europe is not entirely correct. Having just been over in France recently where the cheapest was 1.52 Euros then taking the current exchange rate into account it is actually cheaper here than France.
Can't speak for other countries, but a lot of the disquiet is caused by inadequate media coverage of what is actually going on in Europe, whether it is money or the weather. It is easier(and lazier) to just state that the grass is greener on the other side of the fence.

Mitchell April 28, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Shell CFO this morning has come out and said they are starting to see signs of demand destruction. Indeed good for prices ( theoretically ) but bad for the economy.

Its my experience that no matter what amount of poor economic data surfaces , traders will always be bullish over a piece of insignificant good news. Its becoming a bubble.

Simon Woodward April 27, 2011

report reply to Simon Woodward

Prices are going up and yes we need to get use to it. To help keep my cost down I get email alerts but need them on the move aswell. Is there any plans for an app on Android for this .

Andy April 27, 2011

report reply to Andy

Phew 0.5% growth we are saved.

Hang on a sec though it was -0.5% to december so the economy is now slightly behind where it was in September and now everythings more expensive. Hmm not looking brilliant Mr Chancellor.

Andy April 26, 2011

report reply to Andy

383

I dont believe the world is running out of oil at all. Billions of barrels of proven reserves are out there. However it would see to me that we have burnt through the cheaper stuff and are now into the more expensive to produce oil, hence the higher prices. In order to afford this more expensive oil we have to become more efficient with it and not waste it to the extent that we have been.

I find it very interesting that despite Saudi and the UAE announcing production cuts the oil price has not risen. This would indicate to me that demand is falling sharply, now this may be efficiency savings or it maybe that consumers are cutting back and only spending on those things they really need/places they have to go. This is good for fuel prices but bad for the economy.

If we see another big demand drop i would expect to see countries returning to recession as oil use and economic growth have in the past gone hand in hand. It will be very interesting to see the 1st quarter GDP figures which i believe are out tomorrow. If they are negative we are technically back in recession.

Gary April 26, 2011

report reply to Gary

its disgusting why we are being used like a cash cows by the goverment and petrol retailers. especially when the amercans only pay about 2 pound a gallon why do we put up with it maybe its because we a pushover and people just go along with it.

Kennedy April 26, 2011

report reply to Kennedy

382,
Can't decide if Son of Peak is a proactive green party member, or a Womble of Wimbledon, i.e. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.
He must imagine that if you say something often enough then people will begin to think it must be true. As someone said in a previous blog "If the world truly is running out of oil, why do we keep building and buying petrol/diesel engined vehicles"?. Except for the terrible events in Japan, the rest of the world haven't cut petrol/diesel engine production because of the so called "Peak Oil" theory, yet Son of Peak still stands on his soap box relentlessly spouting his unrealistic (find local employment etc etc, yeah, right) claptrap.
Odds on that it won't be the last time we see copy/paste of 312, 341 & 380.

Mitchell April 26, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

380 #

Why do you continue to post other peoples articles on here?

Its also 5 months out of date. Stop copy and pasting this rubbish, if we wanted to read this kind of garbage , we would buy the Daily Mail.

Peterjames April 25, 2011

report reply to Peterjames

My local bus company had cut services by 14% and increased prices by 10%.....must be a similar story in parts of the country...nice!

Son Of Oil Peak April 25, 2011

report reply to Son Of Oil Peak

Fuel duty and VAT increases always make for great political bun fighting in the week before a budget, but yesterday's opposition day debate failed to excite. The focus continues, understandably, to fall on the short-term issues around the cost of fuel but fails to take a bigger picture perspective and look long-term at oil dependency, fuel poverty and the evident lack of choice available to the British public.

The debate on the 'Fuel crisis and the cost of living' offered an opportunity for Labour to make up for the clever but much criticised proposal from Ed Balls this weekend which called on government to drop the planned rise in VAT on fuel.

But are we missing the bigger picture behind the immediate crisis?

Peak Oil is or has arrived, climate change is happening, Middle Eastern unrest is current and the UK's dependency on oil is certain - but instead of looking for a way to wean ourselves off the oil drip before we're forced to go cold turkey, we're having a political row about the price of petrol tomorrow; perhaps with good reason - we don't really have much choice about how we travel so our society is reliant on free-flowing oil.

The concern that really ought to be raised is that the British public has been priced out of making a choice.

As the price of motoring has fallen and public transport has become more expensive, the squeezed middle has lost the opportunity to make a choice about how they travel. By removing transport choice and forcing a direct dependency on oil, governments have directly penalised the middle and lower income families and we're only just beginning to realise how dramatic the impact will be.

Being able to access and afford oil has become a necessity, so the price hikes will be felt by all.

It's not just oil dependency we need to manage. The current transport system fails to tackle congestion, compounds on increasingly poor health, is detrimental to the state of the environment and excludes those people who do not have access to a car.

Of course there are some journeys which need to be made by car and which will continue to require private motorised transport, at least in the foreseeable future. But 23 per cent of car journeys are less than two miles long and 56 per cent less than five miles and government should be focusing on making it possible for the majority of those journeys to be made by other modes such as walking, cycling and public transport.

And there are a whole host of journeys we make for example to the out of town supermarket or to the post office in the next town - which could be removed from oil dependency if we looked more holistically at policy decisions.

Land use planning, investment from health, and a more coherent understanding of school travel are all policy areas which could significantly reduce the number of journeys we currently need to make by car.

Peterjames April 24, 2011

report reply to Peterjames

"377".....if fuel prices don't affect you then why bother posting on here...as far as independent retailers go, don't most of the "big boys" oil companies deliver to them anyway, so, if independents do go out of business the big boys still supply no matter what and prices will rise as there will be less outlets to sell " thier" fuel...take a look along the high street and see how many tesco express are cropping up slap bang in the middle of a high street full if independent grocery retailers, it's called retail Market domination, and unfortunately it's working, tesco won't be happy until we are all shopping in thier supermarkets with nowhere else to go...same goes for likes of esso and bp etc...fuel duty cut was a token gesture and they knew the longer and longer prices went up, any respite and measly cut would back the public down...but fuel has actually risen quicker over a shorter period of time since that duty cut....greed.. Plain and simple...

Andy April 24, 2011

report reply to Andy

377

Government just reduced fuel duty 3 weeks ago, you cant expect another reduction already surely.

Andrew April 24, 2011

report reply to Andrew

We have all gone mad we sit down and moan moan but do nothing i think a fuel protest should be done on a weekly basis until we get some sort of reduction on fuel not just for cars/ motoring purposes but for the every day living costs of fuel. I would encourage a fuel protest on the 5th May so it would be highlighted against the local elections and the av referendum thats when the politicians should see we have had enough of the Taxes in this downridden country. We need to PROTEST otherwise nothing will happen and diesel will be £2.00 alitre by the end of summer with petrol closely behind at £1.90 a litre. Lets try and get as many people to organise this soon

Andy April 23, 2011

report reply to Andy

Brilliant Steve, lets put all those independant retailers out of business because they dare to try to make a profit.

What do you aim to achieve?, prices are rising even at the "cheaper" stations all your doing is shopping around. Nothing wrong with that but its not going to reduce fuel prices.

Steve April 22, 2011

report reply to Steve

Am I missing something here, I've not been onto this site for a while but thought I would have a look at how things are progressing due to the weekly increasing petrol prices. Nothing since December! Have we all given up? Where's the fighting British spirit gone? Everybody moans about the cost of fuel but nobody seems bothered to do anything anymore WHY?
People blame the Government but in March they reduced the tax (ok very small amount) but every little help. Garages reduced the price by 1p per litre for one or two days then increased it by 1p virtually every week, my local garages are now on average 7p dearer than before the budget so we cant keep blaming this lot in power. I urge every one SHOP AROUND the prices differ from garage to garage, see it cheaper then top up on fuel. Don't wait till you are almost out of fuel as the dearer garages will profit from you having to buy petrol. If you are running low and can only find an expensive garage to fill up at then "piss them off" by putting the minimum in to gat you to a cheaper garage.

COME ON LETS DO SOMETHING!!!

Andy April 21, 2011

report reply to Andy

IMF says oil prices to rise 60% within a year.

Hmm not sure about that can the world afford $200 oil. I dont think so.

Andy April 21, 2011

report reply to Andy

Your wasting your breath mate, people would rather whinge and moan about prices rather than change their habits. In time they will be forced to change and then they will complain that no one told them what was going on. None so deaf as those who will not listen.

Dont worry about peak oil it wont happen cause when the price gets high enough more production will be brought online. Of course YOU may not be able to afford that price but as long as someone can then does it really matter. How many people in this country worry that $50 a barrel is more than half the world could ever afford. As long as when it comes to their turn not to be able to afford things they accept it with good grace everything will be fine.

Lol man im depressing today....... think the sun is getting to me, must be all that global warming

Andy April 21, 2011

report reply to Andy

370

Prices will stop rising when supply and demand balance that is free market capitalism. The question is how free is the market.

It would seem that Saudi believe there is no demand for extra oil at the minute, meanwhile US oil inventories (while at a relative high) are in freefall. Gonna be interesting to see what happens in the next few months.

Alex April 20, 2011

report reply to Alex

Well I've read a lot of comments on here and one thing that doesn't seem to have been mentioned on here is population growth - quite simply the more people in the world the more demand for its resources and unfortunately we now have too many people in the world for the resources that are left! Many people on here will disagree or think this statement is too strong, but unfortunately it's fact. If the world population was half of what it is today none of these price increases would be necessary, oil and other reserves would last much longer...

It's not a problem I think many Government's are strong enough to control. So this problem will continue to get worse and worse. Our way of life is going to have to change and all normal people (i.e. not rich) will from now on be worse off year on year. This could all lead to civil war or even another world war are people seeing now how serious this is? Expensive oil is only the start, lack of food will be the next problem and this will affect everyone.

Sorry for the gloom and doom, but this is the way it is! Unless we can come up with a cheaper non polluting readily available energy supply and a method for growing more food, the population growth of this planet will eventually lead to the extinction of the human race.

Jake Smith April 19, 2011

report reply to Jake Smith

"Son of peak"......Most of ypour comments and suggestions are laughable and confirm how deluded you really are....Ok, Ill just pop out and get myself a local job....easy yes?....Ill catch the train to Newcastle for my 7am business appointment from Lincoln tomorrow....a piece of cake yes?......Ill carry my weekley shopping 15 miles away on my bike handlebars along the A46 bypass...a sinch yes?.....Ill buy myself a smart car and drop all my tools and equipment in the boot....why of course?.....Climate change is a natural Phenomenon but its being helped along by us humans, China, USA and India need to rethink thier strategy and sign up to the Kyoto agreement fast......
I agree that building new roads is costly, but they are needed to a degree and longer, smoother roads ensure less fuel consumption...Your comments {"For the terminally bewildered amongst you I repeat" / "Got it"} indicate that you have a real superiority complex and seem to think that the rest of us who put aside and use a huge percentage of our hard earned cash each month for a commodity that is essential to us earning a living, are fools!!....Fuel isnt expensive, its the government tax percentage {greed} that grips the nations goat...If in 10/15 years time yours and my children are driving around in fully electric cars when the oil is depleted, the ruling government will STILL find a way to load the tax on at an unaccpetable rate....I agree that theres actually nothing we can do, and demonstrations/protests are futile in the face of a democracy that BS its public that elects them, yes we have to get used to it and it hurts us all......Get a grip on reality man for christs sake....

Arthur April 19, 2011

report reply to Arthur

One thing that never changes is that there is always change".

It's a fairly common expression. Everything changes - and that fact is the only thing that doesn't. The other common one (flipside) is that 'People don't like change'. All I'm really say is that we have had a number of years of 'good times' built on credit and it can't continue - hence many of the changes (higher taxes etc) that people are complaining about.

I think people sometimes need to look back over the last 50 years or so and see that what we and parents thought of as 'normal' would be perceived as unbelieable hardship now - look at the 'change' there!

Son Of Oil Peak April 19, 2011

report reply to Son Of Oil Peak

Peak Oil has arrived.

Many changes can be made to minimize the consequences of declining oil reserves. Here are just a few:

Decide which of your energy uses are essential, which non-essential - and get rid of the non-essential ones.

Undertake this assessment on an on-going basis with family and friends.

Move towards renewable energy sources when your budget allows.

Drive only when necessary. Go without a car one day a week, then two days, then three (and so on).

Start saving for a car that won't use oil: they will probably be on the market within the next year or so.

Grow as much food of your own as you can or buy locally grown food - the food you buy in chain stores and supermarkets need vehicles to get it there.

Get involved in local planning to discourage cars and encourage public-transport initiatives, bikes and walking.

Support car-free zones for your community - areas that can be developed for cultural expression.

Write to local papers.

Set up a local planning committee and invite your local representatives to participate.

Start asking your government questions about what it's doing to develop alternative energy

Beard Of Zeus April 19, 2011

report reply to Beard Of Zeus

@362, 363

Seems a tad pathetic really that the one part of your life where you gain any joy is by posting ludicrous, non funny remarks on a petrol blog. Most presumably you are also laughing at your own comments as well....

Seems to me you need to either take a serious look at your life in general or up your dosage of Prozac.

Seriously have something productive to say or find a new way to relive your boredom . Maybe start by reading a dictionary??

Isaq Mohammad Jahad April 19, 2011

report reply to Isaq Mohammad Jahad

U WILL BE LIVING IN OUR ISLAMIC COUNTRY OF THE UK SOON AFTER WE TOOK UR GOVERMENT OVER, FUEL PRICE WILL BE SKY HIGH FOR ANY ONE WHO IS NOT FROM ISLAM WORLD

Masterbader April 19, 2011

report reply to Masterbader

@359,
Would you and your various pseudonyms please f^ck off? You're not funny, you're spelling is atrocious, and your coming across as massively ignorant wa*kr. Please try contribute, or take your sh*t elsewhere.

At the very least, STOP SHOUTING, and take caps lock off.

Isaq Mohammad Jahad April 19, 2011

report reply to Isaq Mohammad Jahad

U WILL BE LIVING IN OUR ISLAMIC COUNTRY OF THE UK SOON AFTER WE TOOK UR GOVERMENT OVER, FUEL PRICE WILL BE SKY HIGH FOR ANY ONE WHO IS NOT FROM ISLAM WORLD

Mitchell April 18, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Seems ominous, it seems to be the demand for saudi crudes that is taking a demand hit due to the quality , its seldom that refineries in europe want to take this due to the pains of reducing the sulphur levels from heavy crudes.

Will be interesting to see US DOE report on wednesday and see if the data correlates.

Also RTFO jumped last week another 0.5% adding further pressure to the pumps.

Peter April 18, 2011

report reply to Peter

________________________________________HI There,
Iam 22yrs old
Money hard to save right now because every time i go to the pump at the supermarket in Bridgwater iam getting rip off and peoples who live in Bridgwater are too.

Why are Petrol Prices and diesel Prices are Cheapest in Taunton and Street and Weston super mare in Somerset? Is have Been Cheaper at the same Supermarkets Sames Places for about 4 to 5 years now.
I drove around in my car in Somerset and look at the Supermarket prices in different area for Somerset, Same Supermarket Morrisons and Sainsburys in Bridgwater, Taunton,Street,Glastonbury, in Somerset where there is Only One different the prices at the pump is different in theses area. When on petrol prices.com too and found out that the prices is unleaded 3p cheaper a litre and diesel 2p cheaper a litre when travel miles out off Bridgwater.

Why in Bridgwater Somerset is the highest in Somerset???
People's off Bridgwater are getting rip off and more money is being spend filling up a vehicle every week,month,years to come in Bridgwater. Been happening far too long now every where else is be Cheaper at the same Supermarkets Sames Places for about 4 to 5 years now.Is it not Right.Action is needed When Oil $121.24 a barrel and sky high at the Pumps in Bridgwater somerset.
I would like to spend my money on something elses and not worrying about filling up my car and keep thinking will I have spare moneys for this week. I understand that Morrison’s, Sainsbury’s are saying to customers spend 40.00 pounds in Morrison’s get 6p a litre of Unleaded and Diesel. Sainsbury’s saying to Customers spend 50.00 and get 5p off a litre from Unleaded and Diesel. I Don’t See that fair Is just making More Money to Supermarket in there Pay wages end of the day.

Here my Working out calculator I did help you out and under stand

Month

Bridgwater Taunton
Unleaded 95 Unleaded 95
40.00x4=160 40.00x4=160
Litres=118.60 Litres=121.32

Month

Bridgwater Taunton
Diesel Diesel
40.00x4=160 40.00x4=160
Litres=113.56 Litres=115.20

Year Year

Bridgwater Taunton
Unleaded 95 Unleaded 95
49x12= 49x12=
Litres=5564.44 Litres=5944.68


Year Year

Bridgwater Taunton
Diesel Diesel
49x12=5811.40 49x12=5644.80

Would like too hear from you soons.
From Peter Arnak

Andy April 18, 2011

report reply to Andy

355

Yes very interesting, is this the first sign that the economy is in freefall once again. Amazing that after losing 1.6mbpd from Libya that the Saudis are now cutting 0.8mbpd. Had demand really dropped by that much already. If so thats incredible, thats almost the same as the drop when we had the last crash and so soon into the supposed recovery.

I think perhaps the Saudis have learnt the lessions from the last crash and dont want to see oil at $30 again and so are cutting production now to keep prices up. Or it may be the case that they were pushing their fields beyond a sustainable production rate and now need to rest them before the summer peak demand period. We will soon find out

Mitchell April 18, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Target prices have appeared and look to be almost $100/t lower than current prices. Saudi have cut production by 800,000 bpd due to weak demand. Its seems we are in for a slight drop towards 100$ a barrell in the near term.

Mitchell April 15, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

I agree , his posts make me cringe with embarrassment over the terrrible attempts at satire.

He sounds like he still lives in 1970s yorkshire and someone is shutting his pit down.

Kenedy April 15, 2011

report reply to Kenedy

352 Chief,
It would be better not to comment on idiots such as 345/351 as it only gives them an audience, I've never found him (or his other guises) even remotely funny, and as you say his spelling and grammar leave a lot to be desired.
Even peak oil (or son of) makes better reading, and that's saying something almost too hard to believe.

Chief April 15, 2011

report reply to Chief

@351

Your spelling and grammar are terrible. I know you're trying to be funny, but it's hard to laugh with you when you write like that.

Winston Doltant April 14, 2011

report reply to Winston Doltant

At least i got my 5 Million Bankers Bonus. So i will be able to run the Jags. Take 20 holidays over seas and maybe build a Mansion this year. But seem's this Recession is quite bad after all as i said to the dear wife. We were able to buy 3 big houses and 30 holidays a year before the crash in 2008. I hope the poor people, of the UK. Enjoy there SMART PRICE baked beans on old stale bread for there dinner's tonight. A good old english servents supper. PS i feed the dogs better than the servents.

W Doltant

vote Tory party on may 6th .and send all the poor people to p.o.w camps to work as slave labour for the Super Rich Classes Mr Cameron. And bring on the new world order where rich control the poor classes.

ETON CHAP FOR LIFE :D

Andy April 14, 2011

report reply to Andy

Its starting to look as if Saudi never increased production at all through Feb/March. They now look to be producing 8.5/6 mbpd according to many reports. Did that extra production through Jan- Mar actually just come from storage. They say there is no demand for the extra oil, how can that be. If they produced 12mbpd as they say they can and sold it for $90 there would be demand, i think Saudi are already producing flat out.

Chinas demand looks set to rise to 10.4 mbpd up nearly 7% on last April. Looks like prices are set to rise to me.

Steve April 13, 2011

report reply to Steve

Am I missing something here, I've not been onto this site for a while but thought I would have a look at how things are progressing due to the weekly increasing petrol prices. Nothing since December! Have we all given up? Where’s the fighting British spirit gone? Everybody moans about the cost of fuel but nobody seems bothered to do anything anymore WHY?
People blame the Government but in March they reduced the tax (ok very small amount) but every little help. Garages reduced the price by 1p per litre for one or two days then increased it by 1p virtually every week, my local garages are now on average 7p dearer than before the budget so we cant keep blaming this lot in power. I urge every one SHOP AROUND the prices differ from garage to garage, see it cheaper then top up on fuel. Don't wait till you are almost out of fuel as the dearer garages will profit from you having to buy petrol. If you are running low and can only find an expensive garage to fill up at then "piss them off" by putting the minimum in to gat you to a cheaper garage.

COME ON LETS DO SOMETHING!!!

Andy April 12, 2011

report reply to Andy

Prices currently down 4% on last nights close on Rotterdam refined products.

but where are they compared to a week/month ago.

Lets see how it plays out over the summer. I think that we will see round 2 of the recession. The economy is far too weak to maintain $120 dollar oil IMHO so we may well see a big drop off in prices but the cost will be very damaging in economic terms.

Mitchell April 12, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

A report from platts this pm.

Oil prices are posting aggressive losses this afternoon following a roll over to the May delivery Gas Oil Future contract. Traders have turned bearish following the IEA report this morning and the IMF and Goldman Sachs comments

We are downgrading all products from cautious buy to hold.

Prices currently down 4% on last nights close on Rotterdam refined products.

Mitchell April 12, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Oil demand across the US and China still has not hit the key 30mbpd mark that it did in 2008. We are still WELL below 2008 figures for both supply and demand sides however oil is heading to the same price.

Nigerian Bonny light wont be disrupted either as is almost traditional around election time.

Andy April 11, 2011

report reply to Andy

342

Saudi may well have 3.5mbpd of spare capacity but at what price can that spare capacity be brought online.

As far as i can see all producing countries have varying oil reserves which can be produced at different production costs. Saudi will be no different. The first mbpd may be being produced at $10/b The 9th mbpd might be being produced at $100/b. If the 11th mbpd of production needs $150/b we wont see that being produced until prices hit that level.

Saudi could produce all out if the oil price reached the right level but of course the Saudis dont say what price that is. It may be that it would take $200 oil for the Saudis to produce 12.5mbpd. The question then is can the world economy afford $200 oil.

As far as supply and demand go oil demand is growing strongly and supply has not kept pace. The oil market started to tighten well before the Libyan crisis removed 1.7m b/d of global oil supply. In 2010, world oil demand grew by 2.8m barrels per day (3.3pc) while supply rose by only 2.2m b/d (2.6pc), leaving a 600,000 b/d gap that was filled by drawing on commercial inventories.

Pete M April 11, 2011

report reply to Pete M

RE 336 :

Great idea - Then we will see the country go bankrupt and fuel will increase by six pence a litre as per Labour's original plan.

They may as well finish the destruction of the country they started.

Mitchell April 11, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Saudi has dismissed concerns over its spare capacity and said it could increase supplies to 12.5m bpd from the current 9m bpd if required.

Peak oil has arrived?

Same old numpty. There is some gross over extension on speculation at the moment. We are heading for a 2008 style crash , oil is massively overvalued.

Supply is greater then 2009 and demand is less than 2009 however oil is trading at a $60 premium to this time two years ago. Overvalued = eventual panic sell = eventual collapse in prices.

Son Of Peak April 9, 2011

report reply to Son Of Peak


Peak Oil has arrived.

Many changes can be made to minimize the consequences of declining oil reserves. Here are just a few:

Decide which of your energy uses are essential, which non-essential – and get rid of the non-essential ones.

Undertake this assessment on an on-going basis with family and friends.

Move towards renewable energy sources when your budget allows.

Drive only when necessary. Go without a car one day a week, then two days, then three (and so on).

Start saving for a car that won’t use oil: they will probably be on the market within the next year or so.

Grow as much food of your own as you can or buy locally grown food – the food you buy in chain stores and supermarkets need vehicles to get it there.

Get involved in local planning to discourage cars and encourage public-transport initiatives, bikes and walking.

Support car-free zones for your community – areas that can be developed for cultural expression.

Write to local papers.

Set up a local planning committee and invite your local representatives to participate.

Start asking your government questions about what it’s doing to develop alternative energy.

Keith April 7, 2011

report reply to Keith

Re 337.

I disagree. Oil is still to cheap everywhere. It is universally taken for granted, it is our one shot chance (thank you Fred Hoyle from 1964 or so) and we are blowing it on cheap trinkets and trips to superstores to look at the next must have rubbish.
What would be more productive is to use this wonderful, still plentiful (for the moment) uniquely energy dense substance, to get infrastructure in place RIGHT NOW whilst it is still easily available, that will cushion the inevitable powerdown that is to come.

Danko April 5, 2011

report reply to Danko


Fuel is STILL too cheap in the UK. Peak Oil will change all that.

D/ April 5, 2011

report reply to D/

time to get labour back in and torys out on 6th may.

Mitchell April 5, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

More a Chinese cooler. Chinese interest rates up another 25 base points this morning , i think that they are in genuine fear of overheating for them to have 2 such close increases.

Andy April 5, 2011

report reply to Andy

You expecting another huge financial crash fairly soon then?

Im not sure, i think the momentum that the economy has picked up will drive oil prices higher in the short term but we must be coming close to the limit of what the economy can stand. Perhaps another big economic dive will come along to dampen oil prices. Unfortunately Goldman now say s that oil seems to have found a base level at $100 barrell. Looks like the cheap stuff has gone for good now.

Mitchell April 5, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

I dont see a long term upside for oil. i think we might be on a relative plateau for a few months until the fundamentals drastically change.

Andy April 5, 2011

report reply to Andy

Well there we are, oil is now the most expensive in sterling terms ever. In 2008 it hit £73.5 ish per barrel today its £74. The question is where will it be by mid summer.

Mitchell April 4, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

#319

Did you forget that we hit $140 a barrel 3 years ago?

The only reason it didnt pinch is because sterling was much stronger.

Pilotpete April 2, 2011

report reply to Pilotpete

!st time on this site.....prices are way out of date....and some major filling stations are not even listed is this the same in all areas?.......

Vic April 2, 2011

report reply to Vic

Peter
The cost of fuel to the Esso station has gone up by that much (and more). In what way is it greedy to pass that cost on to the customer?

Supermarkets are selling below cost - so when all the petrol stations have closed down, what do you think will happen to prices then?

Getting angry about basic economics isn't going to help you. Learn the facts and deal with it.

Peterjames April 1, 2011

report reply to Peterjames

Further to my last post...esso up by another penny today, that's two increases in two days..had to chuckle in that this particular garage used to be busy, it's like a ghost town now...,good ..you bunch of greedy fckin stnuc. . .....

Price Action April 1, 2011

report reply to Price Action

This approach shows the way to win back that waning custom at the pumps. Perhaps many retailers should try this to get some occasional fizz into their ailing business!

From the Daily Mail today -

'Huge queues outside garage as decimal point blunder sees Asda sell petrol for 12.9p a litre:

Motorists queued outside Asda's store in Rooley Lane, Bradford, desperate to make the most of the error, which was caused by the misplacement of a decimal point. Some motorists made off with a full tank of fuel for a measly four pounds before staff at the store realised what was happening and stepped in to end the bargain buying. The accidental cut in prices happened from 10.30pm until 12.20am early on Wednesday this week.'

Price Action April 1, 2011

report reply to Price Action

It may be an April Fool but it does show the way to win back that waning custom at the pumps. Perhaps many retailers should try this to get some occasional fizz into their ailing business!


Huge queues outside garage as decimal point blunder sees Asda sell petrol for 12.9p a litre

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1372389/Huge-queues-form-outside-garage-decimal-point-error-means-petrol-sold-just-12-9p-litre.html#ixzz1II0q96wN

Motorists queued outside Asda's store in Rooley Lane, Bradford, desperate to make the most of the error, which was caused by the misplacement of a decimal point. Some motorists made off with a full tank of fuel for a measly four pounds before staff at the store realised what was happening and stepped in to end the bargain buying. The accidental cut in prices happened from 10.30pm until 12.20am early on Wednesday this week.

Price Action April 1, 2011

report reply to Price Action

It's may be an April Fool but it does show the way to win back that waning custom at the pumps. Perhaps many retailers should try this to get some occasional fizz into their ailing business!

Motorists queued outside Asda's store in Rooley Lane, Bradford, desperate to make the most of the error, which was caused by the misplacement of a decimal point. Some motorists made off with a full tank of fuel for a measly four pounds before staff at the store realised what was happening and stepped in to end the bargain buying. The accidental cut in prices happened from 10.30pm until 12.20am early on Wednesday this week.

Peterjames March 31, 2011

report reply to Peterjames

"323"..nice one Osborne...my local esso put UP diesel by a penny today, they keep pushing and pushing and naff all we can do about it! There's a rumour going around my local area that that esso garage will be boycotted for taking the Mick, generated on Facebook....will it make a huge difference, I doubt it but it shows the general public feeling about it...do we remember when diesel was considerably cheaper than petrol? Why? Because there were more petrol cars on the road thus more demand for that fuel type & higher revenue/ profits... Diesel has been more expensive than petrol for a long time, why? Well I'm sure I don't have to explain that one...."always look on the briggggght side of life, da da, da , da, da da da da da daaaaa...

M. March 31, 2011

report reply to M.

#321
"Just to remind everyone that there is also 20% VAT on the duty itself. So all petrol stations should actually reduce their prices by 1.2p per litre, not just 1p. I have so far not seen any petrol station reduced their prices by this full amount including VAT, making the prices 1xx.7 per litre instead of 1xx.9 per litre"

But when duty goes up 1p I don't see 1xx.1 either..so swings and roundabouts really.

It is worth noting platts is now higher than what is was before the duty cut, expect to see pricing going up more yet as this comes through to sites.

Andrew Peng March 31, 2011

report reply to Andrew Peng

Just to remind everyone that there is also 20% VAT on the duty itself. So all petrol stations should actually reduce their prices by 1.2p per litre, not just 1p. I have so far not seen any petrol station reduced their prices by this full amount including VAT, making the prices 1xx.7 per litre instead of 1xx.9 per litre.

Andy March 31, 2011

report reply to Andy

318

Trouble is the figures have been adjusted so much recently that the traders dont believe the data. They do believe that China (predicted to demand 1mbpd extra each year for the next 10years) is going to increase consumption and therefore prices are going to rise until the Chinese outbids the rest for the oil the require.

Kellerman March 30, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

Except, Mitchell, we're paying 40% more today for the same amount of crude as six years ago. That we're hoping for "only" $100 oil is quite telling of how bad it has gotten.

Mitchell March 30, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Prices sliding.

This week US Stocks up 2.9 mb , demand down 705,000.

Seems things are drifting lower in the short term as expected.........

Andy March 29, 2011

report reply to Andy

Very good Keith.

Thats the whole point of peak oil, you dont have a choice when it will/has happen/ed it will do it without the ok of the human race. We cant put it off because its inconvienient its just tough. Things are going the right way with prices rising it will mean that we will have to waste less and use it for more important things such as medicines and food rather than driving to work.

You guys at 313/4 seem to think the government is in control, how will you cope when you find out that they are not and you are on your own.

Keith March 28, 2011

report reply to Keith

313 & 314

Guys, you are missing the point. You won't have a choice . This is a one way street.

The Daily Mash recently published a story which pretty much sums things up for you. A lovely little tale for our times, times in which shiny things matter until reality catches up, and things catch up in the 3rd paragraph from the bottom. And yup, it's a copy and paste:


APPLE'S revolutionary iPad 2 has been launched on its inevitable trajectory towards a big stinking crater full of broken and rotting things.

The company said customers will not believe how quickly its newest desirable machine will perform basic functions like browsing, photograph sorting and being buried in a filthy hole.

An Apple spokesman said: "iPad 2 is made even more beautiful by its sheer impermanence. Like a square butterfly made from aluminium and plastic.

"Within 18 months it'll be noticeably slower to turn on, the innovative touch screen will have tiny, beautiful cracks and a layer of stubborn finger grease that is a mixture of sweat, crumbs and other bodily secretions.

"Very soon after that, a big noisy lorry will be tipping your iPad 2 into a wet pit where a soiled nappy will slowly smear its contents down the now beautifully abandoned face.

"Then filthy bull-necked seagulls will fight over an old Pickled Onion Space Raiders packet as your iPad 2 slowly submerges into the bottomless mulch of stinking detritus. Possibly with a used sanitary towel stuck to its ergonomically-inspired back panel."He added: "Like everything you will ever love, especially anything with complicated circuitry, iPad 2 will soon be a dead husk whose memory is increasingly blurred by your own dimming perception. For this is the way and the cycle of things.

"Well 'cycle' is perhaps the wrong word considering the iPad 2 won't disintegrate for another trillion years. But rest assured the iPad 2 will be an inspiration for other shinier, equally captivating devices, at least until the oil runs out and the world ends in a massive orgy of blood."

Tom Logan, who drives a digger at a landfill site, said: "I hope the iPad is compatible with broken glass and faeces.

"This is a great place to work. I once saw a human arm."

K.c.b March 28, 2011

report reply to K.c.b

It's a pity that Peak Oil didn't keep doing that which he's so good at (begins with W & rhymes with banking) then we wouldn't have son of peak spouting the same copy/paste cr@p that he always does.
Peter James @313, I agree with everything you've said, but to Peak Oil and his sprog, they'll only ever see one way = THEIR WAY!

Peterjames March 27, 2011

report reply to Peterjames

"Son of peak"......Most of ypour comments and suggestions are laughable and confirm how deluded you really are....Ok, Ill just pop out and get myself a local job....easy yes?....Ill catch the train to Newcastle for my 7am business appointment from Lincoln tomorrow....a piece of cake yes?......Ill carry my weekley shopping 15 miles away on my bike handlebars along the A46 bypass...a sinch yes?.....Ill buy myself a smart car and drop all my tools and equipment in the boot....why of course?.....Climate change is a natural Phenomenon but its being helped along by us humans, China, USA and India need to rethink thier strategy and sign up to the Kyoto agreement fast......
I agree that building new roads is costly, but they are needed to a degree and longer, smoother roads ensure less fuel consumption...Your comments {"For the terminally bewildered amongst you I repeat" / "Got it"} indicate that you have a real superiority complex and seem to think that the rest of us who put aside and use a huge percentage of our hard earned cash each month for a commodity that is essential to us earning a living, are fools!!....Fuel isnt expensive, its the government tax percentage {greed} that grips the nations goat...If in 10/15 years time yours and my children are driving around in fully electric cars when the oil is depleted, the ruling government will STILL find a way to load the tax on at an unaccpetable rate....I agree that theres actually nothing we can do, and demonstrations/protests are futile in the face of a democracy that BS its public that elects them, yes we have to get used to it and it hurts us all......Get a grip on reality man for christs sake....

Son Of Peak March 26, 2011

report reply to Son Of Peak


A TIMELY REMINDER

It's time to end our addiction to oil and here's how we can do it:

A Twelve-Step Plan to End Oil Addiction (courtesy of The Oil Drum)

1. Stop deluding ourselves. The era of cheap, readily-available oil has ended. Prices may fluctuate, but the underlying trend is up, up, up. We have to get used to using less.

2. Demand that politicians take the issue seriously. Make it an election issue. Don't take 'we've got everything under control' as an answer.

3. Stop building new roads. They're a monumental waste of money, time and effort. They encourage, rather than ease congestion and besides, the growth in car travel that's used to justify them isn't going to happen anyway.

4. Divert that money and effort into measures that address the challenges of oil depletion and climate change.

5. Make a major investment in public transport. It needs to be better, faster, more comfortable, more regular and more predictable. It needs to cater for everyone, not just peak-hour commuters though they need a better service as well.

6. Make a major investment in broadband internet to allow more people to work from home and change tax and business practices that discourage working from home. The more car trips we can avoid, the better.

7. Electrify transport where possible. We should be electrifying commuter rail where it is not already electric and using light rail (trams) in the cities. On the other end of the scale, electric bikes and scooters can make a big difference in our cities. And electric cars show promise, though there's a lot of questions to be answered yet.

8. Don't use cars unless there's no alternative. Take the bus. Take the train. Switch to a scooter. Walk or cycle - both your wallet and your doctor will thank you.

9. Deal with other aspects of our oil dependence. Agriculture, for example, is highly dependent on oil. We're going to need to change the way we grow and distribute food. Let's get to work on that now, not wait until supermarket shelves start to empty.

10. Stockpile or manufacture vital products currently imported from overseas. When oil runs short, will that still be possible? Let's take stock now and work out what we may need to start stockpiling or making (again) in the UK.

11. Think local. Ending our oil addiction isn't just up to central government, though it can play its part. Communities can work together to make themselves more resilient. Join or start a Transition Towns group in your local area.

12. Accept reality. The age of cheap oil is over. It's not coming back. As individuals and as a nation, we have to adapt.

From this moment on, oil prices will continue to rise.

For the terminally bewildered amongst you I repeat:

The time is now to start thinking about and making changes to the way you live so your life is not so oil-centered. Remember that a lack of oil extends far beyond just not being able to drive your car - so many other products, services and industries are based on oil.

Start preparing for a life of austerity. NOW!

Find local employment. Reduce your debts. Reduce your fuel consumption. Grow your own vegetables or buy from local suppliers. Exercise regularly. Insulate your home. Help your family, friends and colleagues to understand the implications of Peak Oil.

Got it? :)

Price Action March 25, 2011

report reply to Price Action

The two Etonians running UKplc have the perspective you would expect: only well off privileged people deserve to have transport, a good education and a comfortable lifestyle.

The rest of us proles; even the upper middle, but certainly the middle and working classes, are not required to need these things.

All this is aided and abetted by our darling petrol retailers, supermarkets and other traders who think unsettled economic times are their opportunity to get one over on the ignorant masses by introducing unwarranted inflationary price rises. [In a near stagnant economy you would normally expect unchanged or falling prices.]

Remember all this was initiated by our breathtakingly incompetent Bank Directors, Hedgies, Stock, Exotic Financial Instrument and Commodity Traders who have created the world's worst Financial Fiasco since 1929.

As regards loans to normal business and house-buyers our High Street Banks and other lenders have effectively been on strike now for 2 years and counting. We cannot get even the banks we all now own to behave themselves.

It’s time to batten down the hatches through till 2015 at least; especially as we have all yet all to feel the effect of the big cuts that are coming soon.

Andy March 25, 2011

report reply to Andy

Mitchell

Saudi may only be selling 6.5mbpd but thats because their domestic consumption is running at nearly 2.5mbpd and rising. Their net exports are not increasing and in fact have been dropping since 2005. They are not proudcing enough to offset Libya at least at the minute.

The US report has been "adjusting" their inventories upwards by around 2mb for the last several weeks. No mention of where these adjustments are coming from just that they are adjusted. Are they coming from the SPR i would ask? who knows they may just be paper barrells. If you are correct then prices may well fall back if not then they are set to rise. Time will tell

Mitchell March 25, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Saudi picked up the libyan shortage through their huge excess stock system , current saudi capacity pumped from the ground is 8.9 mbpd and they are currently only selling around 6.5 according to platts. They are using this spare capacity to meet any shortage from Libya.

The US DOE report is the possibly the biggest regular events on the oil markets week. Speculators use the cushing statistics each week as they provide by far the biggest oil consumer (US @ 20mbpd) Crude stocks at cushing were up 2.1 mb where as demand from the hub was up 199,000 showing a clear overstock this week causing the market to correct lower.

Analysts report that oil prices are likely to drift downward in the short term due to falling momentum on the oil price graphs, which look overbought and oversupplied.

Winston Doltant March 24, 2011

report reply to Winston Doltant

ASHAME MR OSBORNE DID NOT PUT THE DUTY UP THE SIX PENCE MORE.
THE MORE OFF THE ROAD. THE MORE THE BETTER SO I CAN GET TO THE COUNTRY GOLF CLUB OUTINGS MORE QUICKER AND HAVE LONGER CHATS WITH MY BANKING CHUMS. POOR PEOPLE ALWAYS SEEM TO GET IN MY WAY.
I SAY STICK UP FUEL 30PENCE ON DUTY MR OSBORNE AND BRING THE FUEL UP TO TEN POUNDS A GALLON.

Kellerman March 24, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

Mitchell: This has nothing to do with US stocks, which are well supplied. Just look at Cushing. That is all oil from Canada, because the oil sands can only transport to the US, and mainly to the mid-west, causing this glut which, paradoxically, also makes other networks within the US pipeline lack enough refined fuel simply down to the sourer nature of oil sands oil.

If you look at the KSA, they have _said_ they'll increase output. But they have done this many times in the past, and anyone who takes an ARAMCO official's word at face value is probably going to be sold a bridge at some point too.

The fact is, total net exports have been declining for several years, and the crash of 2008 along with Katrina's impact in 2005, masked this. Now, with China still growing apace, and the West catching up on consumption again, it is clear that the pinch is on those barrels still available for auction as contracts. Since China can outbid us unless we print cash en masse.

Andy March 24, 2011

report reply to Andy

Mitchell

Where did you get the idea that Saudi have increased production by 1.6mbpd. They have stated that they could but so far have failed to actually increase their production by more than about 0,3mbpd of sweet light crude. They may well have more spare capacity but certainly not of the quality that has been lost from Libya. If and when Saudi increase production by 2mbpd then prices will drop but i for one do not believe they are able to.

The fact that Japanese demand has dropped by around 1 mbpd has helped to stop prices rising for the moment but when their demand moves back to where it was we will find out for sure whether Saudi really does have the spare capacity or whether they are bluffing.

I hope they have the 5-6 mbpd they claim but i fear they do not

Peter James March 24, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Passsed my local esso yesterday and they have knocked 1p off per litre....passed the local sainsburys at the same time and they have stuck at the pre budget price...Nice eh!! I suspect not everyones following the line here...suppose its their perogative ..

Mitchell March 24, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Simple economics indeed and that is how it should be. But of course speculation fuels the price , the CTFC reports are often rubbished in our industry too.

You have a conflict start up in Libya that cuts supply by 1.6mbpd , this supply defecit is instantly filled by Saudi reserves in the short term and an increase in saudi production. Supply has not dropped in the last 6 months and total demand across the US & China is still steady below the key 30m bpd mark.

So in summary supply conditions have not changed since october. Demand conditions havent changed since october . Currency rates have not changed since october. So therefore we have our missing link in the fact that speculation on a future supply shortage is being caused by a massive amount of artificial demand being created by the hedge funds and the investment bank speculators.

Ill leave you with this snippet from my Oil Market Journal this morning.

"Traders are also cautious following a closer examination of the US DOE report.
Although gasoline stocks are now below the five year average it is interesting to
note that total US stocks are tracking the pattern seen last year and remain
above the five year average. US demand is also tracking the level seen last
year, but well below the five year average. This time last year Brent Crude was
$80/b. therefore it could be argued that crude prices are overpriced by $35/b due to over aggressive speculation"

Thanks

Kellerman March 24, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

Mitchell:

The CFTC refuted this idea that the price increases for the last decade are down to speculation. For every winner, there is a loser in the commodities market, so it's a zero sum game. Additionally, speculators do NOT take delivery of product, so someone using the speculation argument would have to explain where all this crude was going.

***
The Task Force’s preliminary assessment is that current oil prices and the increase in oil prices between January 2003 and June 2008 are largely due to fundamental supply and demand factors. During this same period, activity on the crude oil futures market – as measured by the number of contracts outstanding, trading activity, and the number of traders – has increased significantly. While these increases broadly coincided with the run-up in crude oil prices, the Task Force’s preliminary analysis to date does not support the proposition that speculative activity has systematically driven changes in oil prices.
***

The truth is simple economics. If you can't supply the demand, then price bidding happens. Note, this is NOT the same as speculation, which is simply the profiteering from a commodity in normal, well supplied conditions to artificially inflate the price for traders.

The UK became a net importer of oil in 2006. Do the maths, as they say.

Peter James March 23, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Ha ha what a joke...petrol stations pushed up their prices by 10pence a litre in two months in my area....so now we get a pathetic penny off our fuel at 6pm tonight and they think they've done a big favour!!! Sack of bs.... Oh and an extra 45 pounds a year tax better off...wow..

Mitchell March 23, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

#297

Although mildly entertaining , your right wing ranting fails to conceil your obvious ineptitude on the matters you seem to be shouting about.

Fuel Duty today cut from 59.85 pence to 58.95 pence.

Speculators and hedge funds now have a record position of 365,000 oil contracts. Put this into perspective against the 35,000 at the relatively high point of the iraw invasion of 2003 it is very clear to see the reasons for the drastic price jumps in the last 6 months.

A combination of a stronger $ and market forces triggering speculation have contributed to no less than 85% of the price increase during the last 9 months.

If you wish to play hardball with your rants please make sure you have some kind of solid opinion or fact to base it on rather than just capital letters and idol threats you imbecile.

LPG conversion is the 5 year short term solution.

Also 295 #

Although fuel protest undoubtabely could have an effect in the short term , strikes would stagnate economic activity leading to a weaker currency which would effectively neutralise any savings made in fuel duty as the rise in the cost of the $ product would increase to the sterling buyer.

Interest rate increases is the only way i can see any kind of price break at the moment as this would have a positive effect on the currency pushing the price of the raw product down as purchased in $.

Arnold March 23, 2011

report reply to Arnold

Thank you Mr Chancellor, a nice 1p cut in fuel duty that should make life a lot easier. Now no more talk of fuel protests.

Eric Urbanczyk March 23, 2011

report reply to Eric Urbanczyk

hello all I found a way to cut costs drive car
I changed the car for smat
3.5-4 lp100km it nothing low insurance, no tax
This size is ticking but you can get used to everything to cut off unnecessary cost
quick conversion
insurance, lower by 150
This lack of tax savings in the next 220
at 200 miles per week saves + -22 per week gives the year 1140
Total for the year 1500 otherwise 125 pound per week
as for me it was worth the to change

Anti-tax Missile March 22, 2011

report reply to Anti-tax Missile

it is the government not the Oil companies that profiteer.

this and the last pathectic bunch of Khunts (deliberately mis pelt for the grammar police!!))) have ruined this Great Britain.

enough is enough RIOT is to needed!

Keith March 22, 2011

report reply to Keith

Crack on with it then Graham, everybody loves a leader.

Graham Ettritch March 22, 2011

report reply to Graham Ettritch

Why cant we all get organised here and drive down these high fuel prices.
If we were to boycott , say, BP, SHELL TEXACO, there would be plenty of garages for us to still use, witout penalizing ourselves.
Could we not get together to spread the word, from mouth, email, facebook twitter etc and start taking action now .
If we dont, the goverment has already found out we are willing to pay this price! This is going to reduce your wage packet to get to work and you are going to be working just to pay the tax man a good living from your misery !

Kent Hartley March 21, 2011

report reply to Kent Hartley

After years of ownership - now no longer affordable... I have had to part with a wondrful 2.5litre petrol automatic car.

I have (in the last 4 wks) had to downsize to..... a DIESEL (yuck) Peugeot 306 HDI small compact hatchback car. Certainly with a view totry in vien to stay employed, fight against being forced off the road by the ridiculously high rate of increase fuel costs etc, etc.

Now, only after 4wks, Diesel has risen from what was already a whopping £1.36.9 pence per litre. To a now - £1.40.00 pence per litre with expectations from word of mouth to possible go pu to a £1.50 pence per litre ++++++.

This cannot be allowed to continue.

Government - wake up!! You are allowing our nation to be KILLDE off - literally!
Another fuel rise - and I will have no other choice but to hand in my resignation at work as I can no longer affrord to get there!!

I will simply ad to yet another sad statistic out there as being a benefit sucker!
Is this what we call recovery?

Peter James March 19, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Andy.....nice one.....theres a few, and I mean a few, people on this blog that seen to think the tax our government apply to a commodity that is essential, NOT a luxury to a huge percentage of the Uk population is fair...all the fuel I put on my tank is what I need to earn a wage, as most people!....the more it goes up the less I earn...I keep my car on the drive when not at work as I can't afford to drive about taking my family to places we used to visit......the tax on top of vat is the painful thing and affects us all...I'm presuming that if Libya decides to offer oil contracts to India and china our fuel will go up even more...I agree we all have to look at alternative methods of transport but that's easier said than done...as we all batton down the hatches can the government really expect us to spend our hard earned cash on the high street?...answers on a postcard....the rich get richer and poor get poorer!...I wonder what the future holds for our children :-(

Andy March 18, 2011

report reply to Andy

Mitchell

I realise that of course traders and speculators move the oil price, what i am saying to you is that they can trade and speculate all they like but if there oil for sale at $80 and Mr Speculator has just bought 10m barrells at $100 each he is going to lose his shirt. If no one was willing to buy oil at $100 a barrell then the price would not be that. The market will only stand what people are prepared/able to pay.

Of course technology can increase extraction/recovery rates but there is always a cost. Both the cost of the new technology and the fact that the faster you suck the stuff out of the ground the quicker it is gone. What i expect to see in the next few years is that conventional oil (having used advanced extraction methods) will find decline rates of 5-15% a year as we have seen at Cantarell in Mexico. The declines from these Super Giant fields will take a huge amount of replacing. Oil shale and tar sands no doubt will play a part but they are not scaling up anywhere near fast enough.

At the end of the day supply and demand will balance and price is the mechanism through which this happens. If there were suddenly to be another Ghawar found somewhere on the planet then the price would drop. However production has outpaced discoveries for the last 30 years despite some dubious adjustment from Opec countries.

Mitchell March 18, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Andy ,

I work off the Oil Market Journal everyday and i can tell you unequivically that speculators and traders have the single biggest effect on oil prices.

They can buy as much as they please in futures. I today can buy any refined product or crude barrell for delivery at any point in the next 5 years.

Technology naturally pushes production capacity up , and in the long term any sudden jump in demand will be met at an equilibirum price once supply routes open to capacity. Peak Oil which ever way you look at becomes flawed as it failed to ever take increase in supply through either technological means, new discoveries or things such as shale fields which contain masses of potential crude.

I agree that speculation is exactly what cause the drop in 2008 , but it was also what caused the £ to drop in value by 35% thus nearly negating any fall in the price of refined products at rotterdam.

Andy March 18, 2011

report reply to Andy

286

Speculators do not use oil (on a large scale anyway) they can only move the real price by a small amount. You have to remember that although they can stick it on tankers and leave it floating there is a limit to how much of that they can do. There has to be demand at the price. People seem quick to blame speculators for high prices but not for low prices. Remember when oil dropped to $30 in 2009 that was speculation that the economy was going to collapse.

It would seem that higher prices since 2005 have yet to bring more production online. In fact we have been on a plateau since 2005 that in spite of higher prices have yet to raise production levels. This is what peak oil is i believe, not how much is left in the ground but the point at which the world economy can no longer pay the price of increasing production rates.

Its no good have 300 years supply in the ground if you can only pump out 6 months worth in a year. Once the declines start its like swimming against an ever increasing tide. Soon the cost in energy becomes unsustainable and you start going backwards.

Mitchell March 17, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

#285

The taxes levied on our fuel are pretty much in line with other european nations. It seems fairly typical of people on here to make the government a scapegoat.

The price since January 2010 has risen by 26 ppl ex vat.

3ppl of that has been government increases , that accounts for 12%.

The other 88% is due to speculators, these guys are the real criminals.

Big Yellow Van Company March 17, 2011

report reply to Big Yellow Van Company

Hi, Im from the big yellow van company the price of fuel is spiraling out of control. Drivers here at the big yellow van company are struggling to pay for these outrageous taxes the government puts on.

Son Of Peak March 17, 2011

report reply to Son Of Peak


Fuel duty and VAT increases always make for great political bun fighting in the week before a budget, but yesterday’s opposition day debate failed to excite. The focus continues, understandably, to fall on the short-term issues around the cost of fuel but fails to take a bigger picture perspective and look long-term at oil dependency, fuel poverty and the evident lack of choice available to the British public.

The debate on the ‘Fuel crisis and the cost of living’ offered an opportunity for Labour to make up for the clever but much criticised proposal from Ed Balls this weekend which called on government to drop the planned rise in VAT on fuel.

However, Eagle vs. Greening yesterday afternoon was all round disappointing. “Notably scratchy,” said Bercow, but the real concern is that the debate, unsurprisingly, placed focus on the cost of fuel rather than letting fuel poverty and social inequality take centre stage.

The Chancellor, absent from the proceedings, is under mounting political and public pressure to announce some relief for drivers in the Budget.

He is expected to scrap the 1p per litre above inflation rise in fuel duty planned by the previous Labour government but is increasingly less likely to bring in a mechanism to protect motorists from future rises in world oil prices – a fair fuel stabiliser.

But are we missing the bigger picture behind the immediate crisis?

Peak Oil is or has arrived, climate change is happening, Middle Eastern unrest is current and the UK’s dependency on oil is certain – but instead of looking for a way to wean ourselves off the oil drip before we’re forced to go cold turkey, we’re having a political row about the price of petrol tomorrow; perhaps with good reason – we don’t really have much choice about how we travel so our society is reliant on free-flowing oil.

The concern that really ought to be raised is that the British public has been priced out of making a choice.

As the price of motoring has fallen and public transport has become more expensive, the squeezed middle has lost the opportunity to make a choice about how they travel. By removing transport choice and forcing a direct dependency on oil, governments have directly penalised the middle and lower income families and we’re only just beginning to realise how dramatic the impact will be.

Being able to access and afford oil has become a necessity, so the price hikes will be felt by all.

It’s not just oil dependency we need to manage. The current transport system fails to tackle congestion, compounds on increasingly poor health, is detrimental to the state of the environment and excludes those people who do not have access to a car.

Of course there are some journeys which need to be made by car and which will continue to require private motorised transport, at least in the foreseeable future. But 23 per cent of car journeys are less than two miles long and 56 per cent less than five miles and government should be focusing on making it possible for the majority of those journeys to be made by other modes such as walking, cycling and public transport.

And there are a whole host of journeys we make for example to the out of town supermarket or to the post office in the next town – which could be removed from oil dependency if we looked more holistically at policy decisions.

Land use planning, investment from health, and a more coherent understanding of school travel are all policy areas which could significantly reduce the number of journeys we currently need to make by car.

Mitchell March 17, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

#280

I work in the industry , i am perfectly aware of the exact figures that go to the Government. Blatently you have Sh*t for brains and have no idea.

Do you realise that you actually have one of the cheapest prices for unleaded in europe? I know that you actually have zero clue as to the causes for recent price fluctuations at the pump so there is little point entertaining you.

Look at the bigger picture you fool and keep your far right garbage in check. Im sure from this you can deduce that i was actually referring to you as a muppet.

Andy March 17, 2011

report reply to Andy

280

Not sure where you get your figures from but according to the Association of British Drivers, of the 1.40ish for fuel. 82.28 p is tax (including VAT) and 57.72 would be the cost of the fuel. This would mean approx 58% of fuel is tax not 80%.

As others have said how do you want to be taxed to make up for your requested drop in fuel duty? Income tax, council tax, road tax or just massive cuts in services. For what its worth i think we are going to get all of them anyway even without a cut in fuel duty.

Just got to learn to live on a lot less. We can protest and shout until we get a new government but that will not change the fact that we are going to have to live a lot more frugally in a world where China and India are wanting a western lifestyle and are prepared to pay for it. For them to come up we have to go down. Isnt nature a drag, it will insist on balance.

Anti-tax Missile March 16, 2011

report reply to Anti-tax Missile

#272

not april fools day so go away until then. and actually i was very much involved with a technical trade.. use your grey matter friend look at the amount of wastage in quangos and foreign aid etc also not forgetting clawing it back from the bankers that got this country in this mess

#273

sorry didn't think i was writing an essay for a certificate

#276

80% goes to government thus £1.40= 140p= 14p for10% x 8 = 80% = 112p

who exactly are you calling a muppet? your living in another universe... 59p goes to the gov? ha ha ha ROFL cuckoo!

yes i was enlisted most enlisted MEN have brains, unlike officers who are pen pushers and marble mouths stupendous farts that do not look at problems pragmatically just as our government are doing.

sorry to offend you....no i am not lol ...

Keith March 15, 2011

report reply to Keith

Re 278 'when will it stop'

The trend will now be forever upwards. Cheap energy is over. Take a look at the headlines of each day's newspapers, and think really hard about what you looking at. Now join the dots. It's hard to know which is going to precipate things further next, unrest in the ME or the next stage of the banking crisis perhaps?
It's a good time to batten down the hatches.

Mwm March 15, 2011

report reply to Mwm

Average diesel price = £1.38 +

Government Tax per litre = 59p

£1.38 - 59p = your "fair" price of 79ppl

My lord you are one of the bigger muppets to post here, obviously this guy was enlisted rather than commissions as he seems to have the brains of a scarecrow.

Mitchell March 15, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

#272

It seems 271 doesnt have an answer or a clue. I suspect we could save £70 billion by cutting the defence budget again , however i dont think he would find that too agreeable.

[email protected] March 14, 2011

report reply to [email protected]

#271

You spelt legal wrong.

Andrew March 14, 2011

report reply to Andrew

#271 ATM

Bit early for April Fool's Day? And why are you SHOUTING?

Thanks but no thanks - I wouldn't actually want the country crippled - what's the point in that?

Anyway, to get to 79p per litre the Government will have to give up around £70 billion in revenue. What do you want to give up - free health service, schools, pensions?

Don't know what you did in the Forces - clearly nothing requiring brain-power!

Anti-tax Missile March 14, 2011

report reply to Anti-tax Missile



PORTSMOUTH CITY ONLY HAS THREE ROADS LEADING TO IT BLOCK THEM BRING IT TO A HALT.

BOURNEMOUTH AIRPORT HAS ONLY ONE ACCESS ROAD BLOCK IT.
SAME AS HEATHROW.

BLOCK THE M20 AND A2 HALT IMPORT EXPORT.

BLOCK ALL THE MAJOR JUNTIONS OF THE M25

BLOCK THE A13/A14

THIS WILL CRIPPLE THE COUNTRY. CRIPPLING AND HIGH LEVEL ANGRY PROTESTING IS THE MESSAGE OUR GOVERNMENTS UNDERSTAND.

I AM EX FORCES AND KNOW FOR SURE THAT IF THE MEASURES ABOVE WHERE TAKEN THE GOVERNMENT WILL BACK DOWN TO GIVE US A REALISTIC PRICE FOR FUEL.
79P/LITRE IS FAIR AND ALLOWS US TO COMPETE WITH EUROPE.

HONEST MOTHER/FATHERS DON`T LET YOUR CHILDREN SUFFER NO MORE.
HAULERS DON`T LETS THOSE EUROCRATS KILL YOUR CAREERS.

LICENSED TAXI DRIVERS DON`T ALLOW THE HIGH FUEL PRICES KEEP YOUR CUSTOMER FROM GOING OUT AND THUS DESTROY YOUR INCOME.

PUBLICANS DON`T LET THIS HYPE IN FUEL KEEP YOUR CUSTOMERS FROM DRINKING AND DESTROYING YOUR LIVELIHOOD

HONEST HARDWORKING PEOPLE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, WHO FOUGHT OFF ADOLF HITLER, THAT BUILT THE CONCORDE AND PRODUCED THE SPITFIRE THAT HALTED THE LUFTWAFFE.

HONEST HARDWORKING PEOPLE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM THAT BUILT THE GREAT OCEAN LINERS THAT SAILED THE WORLD,

HONEST HARDWORKING PEOPLE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM THAT INSTALLED LEAGAL SYSTEMS AND FAIR POLICY THROUGHOUT THE WORLD LET UNITE AND PUT THE UNITED BACK INTO THE KINGDOM.

MAKE A STANCE

IF ON BUDGET DAY WE DO NOT GET A REALISTIC DROP IN FUEL PRICES LETS GET TOGETHER AND PROTEST AND BRING DOWN THIS SHAM OF A GOVERNMENT






Tbd March 14, 2011

report reply to Tbd

#269

MORON , if you think that anyone gives you credit for predicting cascade revolutions across the middle east your very dim because thats the fundamental reason for the sharp spike in recent weeks. Also because the saudi protests passed largely uneventful we are starting to see things cool off a little bit and they will slowly decline.

P Sheffield March 7, 2011

report reply to P Sheffield

just been to my local petrol station (esso) in worthing and today they have put 3.9p on a litre of diesel. what a con, thanks esso for nothing

J.mcgregor March 7, 2011

report reply to J.mcgregor

BLOCKADES the great fuel rip-off continues tax,tax tax the people can put a stop to it but we must do it in numbers.Blockade all UK REFINERIES.

M Davis March 5, 2011

report reply to M Davis

It is time for Britons to stop moaning, and take direct action instead!

In the UK, the majority of the cost in a litre of petrol is still TAX!

Blockades at Fuel refinery's are now the only course of action that would work. Such action would be especially effective if coinciding with the proposed strike by fuel tanker drivers. This 'Double-Whammy' would force Cameron and Osborne into another u-turn. Recent polls have indicated that the majority of Britons would support such action!

Winston Doltant March 5, 2011

report reply to Winston Doltant

HOW GREAT IT WILL BE WHEN FUEL HITS 2.60 A LITRE.
I WILL BE RICHER THAN EVER. ALL THE POOR HAVE TO GET ON THE BUS AND A FREE ROAD FOR THE RICH AND POWERFUL . AT LEAST I WILL STILL BE ABLE TO AFORD THE ODD GALLON OR 2.



WINSTON DOLTANT

TORY PARTY VOTER.

Keith March 5, 2011

report reply to Keith

If the Saudi Day of Rage leads to unrest, say like in Libya, we shall all be thinking how cheap oil has been up to that point.

Perspective is required, don't you all think?

Protests? Last century. Getting up to speed on the future we face will be more productive, looks like Peak Oils advice will turn out jolly useful.



Norman Sammon March 4, 2011

report reply to Norman Sammon

As a hgv driver going back to the old days of transporting more goods through the canal's systems and rail systems would not be a good move and more and more transport companies will suffer as the are already suffering and going out of business with the the prise of petrol and diesel prices which ver all would not me a good move for the employment factor

not only that when the bad weather comes like we have ben getting the rail network would not be able to keep up with the demands of our society today as the amount of people who got stranded with using rail networks specially the metro link for manchester.

the only way that motorist and transport companies are going to stop this rip off farce that the government are doing is to do what the french did a few years ago and thats is to block the ports refinaries all round the country and do not move until they lower the prices of our fuel today !!!!!

Simon March 3, 2011

report reply to Simon

re #259

like your style and yes your right ,everyone ,moans ,everyon complains but does anyone do anything ? do they fook!

anyone want to camp on the green outside houses of parliment and shout across the road at them ?
im up for it if anyone else is ?
if the bloody students can make an impact (the wrong way i might add) then im sure we all can .
im serious , are you lot ?

Andrew March 3, 2011

report reply to Andrew

#260

Speak for yourself Daz, you don't speak for me or many others.

Fuel price stories seem to be in the papers all the time. The Sun has even had a campaign to get Fuel Duty down! The Mail is always floating some hyped up tale of doom.

Sorry, the 'Entitlement Society' takes the blame for many of the current problems. You have 4 kids - you must have known that would be expensive?

Because of 'Entitlement' (and generally poor governance) the UK is swimming in debt. That can only be paid off by spending less and raising more money. Fuel tax is as legitimate a revenue stream as any other - possibly more legitimate when you consider that there are oil shortages and we need to use less.

Yes, it's bad compared to fuel at 80p a litre and free and easy credit 10 years ago - but that was never sustainable and now it's payback time - for all of us.

Daz March 3, 2011

report reply to Daz

The people of Britain have been beaten down. We are out cold. For some reason the press are not jumping onto the fact that is on everyone’s mind Whenever you go to or go past a petrol stations you think....

...ROBBERY...

They are mentioning it, but not putting the extra effort of going all the way with it. We all know they can, so why not. Probably get slapped with a terrorist charge injunction.

These prices are milking us dry. I have four children, which in my mind, blows public transport out of the scenario for travel.
For some reason the newspapers don't seem to be getting everyone worked up about what all adult members of the driving public think.

...WHO CAN I SHOUT AT IN THIS COUNTRY.....

..(that seems to be run by a bunch of greedy little children).... which will actually do any good. WHO. In this day and age who would have thought it possible. Britain used to lead the world in politics, trade, influence.... now we are like a rotten apple being eaten from within.

The old line ....well, if you knew the half of it..... if we did, we could probably get the lot of them sacked or in prison.


Please....someone in this country just figure it out and make the difference...
Long live GREAT Britain & HMtQ..

K.c.b March 2, 2011

report reply to K.c.b

How many roads must a man drive down,
Before cheap fuel can be found?
And how many times must a protest be mentioned,
Before one gets off the ground?
The answer my friends is we're pi$$ing in the wind,
The answer is we're pi$$ing in the wind.

Andrew March 2, 2011

report reply to Andrew

#257

John, I think that along with all the other suggestions made that rely on "we all", or in your case "the UK", unless you are personally in contact with "all" the other buyers of fuel in "the UK" and are able to get them to do what you want, it ain't gonna happen. In short, it ain't gonna happen.

Apart from that, what is the point of not buying fuel for 24 hours anyway?

John Allan March 2, 2011

report reply to John Allan

I think the uk should find a date for a day and no-one buy petrol for the 24hrs as it is becomming immoral for the cost of a litre of petrol or diesal as the government class the lower class or working class we need to drive to work but the cost is now beyond a joke what does everyone else think ?

Jan March 2, 2011

report reply to Jan

Petrol Too Expensive?

I do not like the cost either, but if we are going to reduce our oil use it has to be.
UK, Norway, Mexico, Indonesia, Alaska, Egypt are all in decline and the amount of oil that EXPORTING countries can EXPORT is falling.
Saudi Arabia has increased production over las ten years, but they are using most of that themselves.
Canadia intend to increase tar sands production by about 2mbd over 8 years, trouble is the world demand will increase by that much this year.
Someone here said oil shale could be the answer but test projects have produced just a few thousands of barrels per day and then closed due to costs.
My advice to anyone here, buy the most economical car you can and if moving house look carefully at public transport.
Yes our tax is high, but look carefully at the United States over next few years and see how cheap fuel and no public transport will destroy that country.
Petition your local council for extra and regular buses, which will take you to and from work etc cheaply.

Rob T March 1, 2011

report reply to Rob T

Just got back from Canada. They're kicking off in a big way at their prices... 74p for a litre of diesel there!

We'll be double that soon...

Kate March 1, 2011

report reply to Kate

#252.. sarcasm....... forced off the road.nice person you are..
Jut like he says in other blogs.... sorry us hard working poor class scum dont so enough

Masterbader March 1, 2011

report reply to Masterbader

@251, if you can't see the sarcasm in 250, it might be best if your forced off the road.

Winston Doltant February 26, 2011

report reply to Winston Doltant

Jolly good i cannot wait till fuel hits 1.80 a litre. Then i will be able to let all rip as i floor it in my jag's or 4x4's on a empty road as poorer people will have to take to the buses. BRING ON DEPOPULATION OF THE POORER CLASS SCUM. :D

TORY PARTY VOTER

Andy February 26, 2011

report reply to Andy

Uh oh a large oil refinery in Iraq has been bombed, protests in Baghdad, if Iraq is next then we are in real trouble. Anything more serious in Iraq and oil prices are going to have a worse week next week than they did this week.

Still reports that Saudi is in for a day of protest on the 11th, how much truth there is in that i guess we shall have to wait and see but if it turns out to be accurate then i think $200 oil is possible.

Look at me getting all negative perhaps i need to hit the pub, just gotta figure out a way to get there.

Chris February 25, 2011

report reply to Chris

*sigh*

It's times like this that I hate living in a rural area - very little is within walking distance (pub, newspaper shop), so I drive. There is a bus at the other side of the village which sometimes turns up, other times just misses us completely. Not that it matters - my journey is cheaper than the bus and takes 20 minutes rather than the 90 it would take me on a bus.

I would love to buy a newer, more economical car - who wouldn't? But with everything (I'm aware not everything is going up, it's just easier to write) going up in price - apart from my wage (graduate on minimum wage - at least I have a job though!) I can't afford one as I am spending so much money elsewhere. I'll just have to go without things, such as... food or heating.

Andy February 25, 2011

report reply to Andy

Perhaps you could organise it William, dont be shy start a campaign.

William Jackson February 25, 2011

report reply to William Jackson

What I want to know is when we are all going to get together and stop driving for a few days or whatever is required to reduce the prices. The government are robbing us. Lets not kid ourselves, the main problem is tax and it is not put back into roads or anything else that benefits the driver.

M. February 24, 2011

report reply to M.

#240"..how does middle east situation cause a predicted hike at our pumps?

Cost price of fuel is set by the market rate (platts)

Yesterday it was $110, today it has hit $119 already, price for the petrol station is based on the market for next day delivery, so when the price goes up sharply its normally only a couple of days before deliveries at the higher price.


#Confirmed above , platts base this morning is 131.8 ppl for diesel

Indeed, if you allow say 1.5-3ppl for the + element then 133.9 will be just about cost +vat

Mitchell February 24, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Confirmed above , platts base this morning is 131.8 ppl for diesel. That equates to around 136.9 at a supermarket , 138.9 at a branded forecourt and 145.9+ at services.

Saudi unrest will = $170 a barrell.

Steve The Poor Petrol Station Owner February 24, 2011

report reply to Steve The Poor Petrol Station Owner

Update on 240
As of 9am this morning petrol and diesel have risen a further 2.13ppl today !!
That's 2.56ppl including VAT
So Unleaded has gone up 5.66ppl this week and Diesel up 6.06ppl this week

Andy February 24, 2011

report reply to Andy

241.

The middle east situation affects the prices at our pumps because the world relies on middle east oil to ensure that there is petrol/diesel at the pumps.

If all Libyan production goes offline then the world will lose about 1.6million barrells of oil per day. Which would equal the vast majority of what the UK uses per day. That makes a big difference.

If things spread to Saudi (and there are some reports that protests are being arrange for early March) you will be wishing for the days when petrol was only £1.33 a litre.

Things are very serious indeed.

Peter James February 23, 2011

report reply to Peter James

"240"..how does middle east situation cause a predicted hike at our pumps?
*advice needed please**...I use my own car for work and I do 30k miles a year...I called tax office and they said if my employer pays me the advised 40p per mile for 1st 10000 miles, then 25p per mile thereafter, I don't get any tax relief at all aš the Pence per mile covers all costs..thats garbage if you take into account the car loan, tax, fuel, tyres, servicing, depreciation and the High cost of insuring the car for business use...most websites say you do get tax relief..so who's right and who's wrong?.....many different opinions.

Steve The Poor Petrol Station Owner February 23, 2011

report reply to Steve The Poor Petrol Station Owner

Over the last 3 days the tension in the Middle East has caused the cost price of Unleaded to increase by 2.5 pence and the cost of diesel to increase by 2.95 pence and it's still rising.
Add the VAT on and you get an increase of 3ppl for Unleaded and 3.5ppl for diesel.
This will start being reflected at all petrol stations by the beginning of next week at the latest. Unless a miracle happens.
Forewarned is forearmed

Di Fiasco February 23, 2011

report reply to Di Fiasco

When are you putting out an Android app???
It's outselling iPhone 4-to-1 these days.

Peter James February 22, 2011

report reply to Peter James

My missus had to sell her car on we buy any car...just can't afford it anymore...they didn't rip her off like some folk reckon...if you put on their website it's in good nick, and when they inspect it they find out it's a right "nail" then only themselves to blame if the price is way below what's quoted on "tinternet" ...if your struggling with bills etc, shop at aldi, don't scoff just yet. .bought our weekly shopping bill down from 100 quid to 68 quid....the fresh stuff is fresh and not like the cr&p you get at the "big boys" supermarkets...own brands but it tastes the same as big brands ..do it and thank me later....food for thought ( pardon the pun").......

Bl February 21, 2011

report reply to Bl

lol have u ever seen a scooter haul a 40 ton trailer . Answer on the back of a postcard lol.

Asif February 21, 2011

report reply to Asif

The fing is yeh , we all need to stop driving n that and get scooters. Scooters are bare cheap to run and if you get one wiv a turbo you can overtake and not get stuck in traffic , you get me? cost like a fiver to fill tank and that last about 100 miles thats like proper sick mpgs. Lets be honest n all fuel only expensive if your stupid enough to get into a position where its well critical.

Steve February 20, 2011

report reply to Steve

the price of fuel pisses me off. but what really grinds my gears is the fact of not having the luxury of owning the car of my choice. a crappy little 1.4 astra aint doing anything 4 me. yes its cheap(er) to run but what im paying into it now is about the same as i was putting into my v6 vectra 18 months ago!!! driving just isnt fun anymore. lets hope they bring a stabiliser in, whatever difference that makes its gotta b better than this. keep fuel at 99.9p a ltr. as long as the letre gauge reads more than the price putting in to the car....smiles all round

Leavetheplace February 17, 2011

report reply to Leavetheplace

Geez, makes me really sad to see what's unfolding in the UK now. I actually went and got a degree so I could leave the place. I honestly didn't think it would end up at 1.40 a litre or what-ever this quick. I now live in Oz, drive an LPG car which is currently at about 38p a litre. Costs me about 20 pound to fill it.
My advice, for what it's worth. Make plans to leave if you have the means....
Oz, NZ, CAN are not perfect by any means but they are all about 15 years behind the (quickly unfolding) Orwellian society of the UK. Either that, or learn about 'Incorporation' and get it done. Interesting that the last tax review (i think, havent looked for while) included a corp tax REDUCTION. Yep, that's right, the Cons did what they should and reduced the tax on the rich via corporate taxes, which is the vehicle every rich person in the UK uses to protect against the effects of the gradual demise of the middle class via tax escalation.

Paul Bradbury February 16, 2011

report reply to Paul Bradbury

I have just finished a series of articles on global fuel prices based on a recent worldwide survey by the German government, which you may find interesting. Info is all backed by official report and is probably the best current snapshot of global price comparison.

UK is expensive! - the third most expensive diesel in the world, 50% more than Luxembourg and a staggering 180 times more than Venezuela. Not sure if you allow links, but the article should be of interest to your readers (there are also others for prices in Europe, Asia etc.) http://www.suite101.com/content/uk-fuel-prices-who-has-more-expensive-petrol-and-diesel-a346880

Molli Scott February 9, 2011

report reply to Molli Scott

Why is there such a variation across the country? It seems stupid that the FK1 area is much more expensive than ML1 when it is closer to the refinery!!

M. February 3, 2011

report reply to M.

#229
"they have a rebate for customers filling up when its hot weather...due to the fuel expansion and getting less in your tank than when its cold..does anyone know this is true, and folk have commented that if we here in blighty fill up when its cold, we get more in our tanks"

Yes this is correct and called tc delivery. When the fuel temp is higher you get more fuel delivered, and when its colder you get less. I believe from memory the cross over is 16c.

You would not get a rebate for hot fuel without getting an invoice for cold fuel, what actually happens is that the pump would give you slightly less fuel when its cold and a bit more when it is hot, it is also based on the temperature of the fuel not the ambient air temperature.

Most of the uk is fairly cool and with the fuel underground the fuel temp is likely to be under 15c so the system would work in favour on the garage most of the time.

Rob T February 2, 2011

report reply to Rob T

#229

What if you already drive as efficiently as possible?

What if you need a big car or a 4x4

Sorry, but I'm sick of people saying the same thing over and over again. I can't tow a three tonne trailer with a motorbike.

Get real.

Tom Smith February 2, 2011

report reply to Tom Smith

If people are so upset with the high duty on fuel, why don't they slow down to get better mpg?

Because of the silly prices, I sold my car and bought a motorcycle, which I ride at an efficient speed (55mph). My mpg has gone from 30 in the car to 90 on the bike.

Upgrade to a fuel efficient vehicle and drive it at an appropriate speed. It makes a massive difference.

Peter James February 2, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Ive seen on the web that in the USA, they have a rebate for customers filling up when its hot weather...due to the fuel expansion and getting less in your tank than when its cold..does anyone know this is true, and folk have commented that if we here in blighty fill up when its cold, we get more in our tanks...hang on,its cold here all the damn time!!! Theres an e-mail circulating that we should all consider NOT filling up at BP,Esso,Shell for a whole year as it will force them into reducing thier prices,well this wont work surely as the big boys supply the supermarkets, so.....we all fill up at Sainsburys, morrisons etc and thier prices increase day by day due to supply and demand and we qeue for ages at the pumps, not to mention the increased traffic as everyone inclding hauliers trapse through the towns and cities off the trunk roads looking for a supermarket....Then...we all go back to Esso after "teaching them a lesson" and they then put thier prices a penny below the sprmkts...Result false high, even higher prices....Who wins, no one, oh apart from the suppliers of the supermarkets, and guess who that is!!!..Good in theory, poor in practice....Someone also mentioned that if you fill up your car/van whatever, and the nozzle goes "click" when nearly full, that if you click further to "top it up" the price at the pump display goes UP, but the actual fuel doenst go in your tank, it re circulates around the nozzle and back into the pump/storage tank...If this is true, then the garage gets another 20 or so pence, and we lose out!! Awsome eh.....

Vic February 1, 2011

report reply to Vic

#226 Ken

How many $s did a £ buy in 2008 and how many $s does a £ buy now?

It very clearly "computes" if you care to apply any thought to the subject - you are in fact BEING a mug if you can't work it out.

Ken Edwards February 1, 2011

report reply to Ken Edwards

in july 2008 oil was 147dollas a barrrel petrol 1.20 litre today 100 dollas abarrell 1.33 litre figures do not compute in real terms we are being taken for mugs lets get this sorted now cameron and co not march today nejy9s

Alleluia Ptl January 31, 2011

report reply to Alleluia Ptl

Hi, There is an email going around suggesting people buy petrol from supermarkets rather than from the main petrol companies.

My question is , Who do the supermarkets buy petrol from? They are not forthcoming in telling me at present.

Will this strategy work??

Nigel January 30, 2011

report reply to Nigel

oh yes lets have a fuel strike, bring it on the roads will be empty and I'll be on them driving about on my filtered waste vegetable oil, which incidentally costs me 33 pence a litre to produce, I( just don't get it loads of com-lainers and not enough activists, it cost me £175 to make the filter system and it paid for itself in three months, now I have even modified the car its saving me 3 grand a year, stop moanning buy yourself a diesel car registered before 1998 make sure its indirect injection and has a bosch fuel pump do some searching online for information and kapow 555 gallons a year tax free motoring. oh and before some idiot starts to tell me its illegal perhaps you'd like to tell the local council & enviroment agency who paid me a visit when a jealous neighbour thought I might be breaking the law, they gave me quite a lot of support and friendly advice. its perfectly legal.

Andy January 29, 2011

report reply to Andy

Mitchell you seem very quick to judge others but your seem to ignore your own failings. In an earlier post you said there are 190 years of oil at current production rates, either you are deluded or have been duped by Big Oil.

Shale oil may well play a part in the future but do you really believe it can scale up successfully. Looking at the figures so far i dont believe so. Estimates from those currently developing shale oil the Bakken field are currently that they will be producing 0.6million bpd by 2020 or about 1/18th of current demand of the US. With the older Saudi fields currently declining at about 3% a year its simply not enough, fast enough. Of course then theres the chance of a Black Swan event, such as riots in the middle east (Tunisia/Egypt a catalyst) which could mean that things hit the fan a lot sooner than 2020.

Either way dont be so quick to judge others, like it or not whatever happens in the next few years we are all in it together and you would do well to show a little more patience and understanding for the position others are in.

K.c.b January 27, 2011

report reply to K.c.b

Certain foods are zero VAT rated, and will be for the foreseeable future, according to HMG. That's reassuring to know, until that is you realise that the lorries that deliver the food to the shops have to pay fuel duty and (reclaimable) VAT, so all zero rated foodstuff doesn't increase with VAT, it increases BECAUSE of VAT & fuel duty. Heads we lose, tails they win.
An increase is an increase in whatever guise it comes.

M Liddell January 27, 2011

report reply to M Liddell

The cost of fuel is just a joke, the government are just taken the p*** they are putting the average family into debt ruining our businesses fuel is an important part of our every day life kids to school, and work and business all requires fuel. they are destroying the country not helping it..................... what happens when we are all unemployed because we cant afford to get to work..............

Mitchell January 26, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Stop embarrassing yourself Stuart , your above comment shows the lack of knowledge you have on the economic front.

Yet another moron poster on this blog who has little idea of the mechanics behind fuel prices and only complains once its starts to pinch his wallett due to filling up a 4 litre jaguar. Of course you are going to tell us you in fact drive a sensible family car or a prius.

Fuel prices are rising , people will adapt to this and you may do well to accept a car as luxury.

Stuart January 26, 2011

report reply to Stuart

217

Yes but if its going in the fuel tank then its not going to the shops. Its going to the Government who are sucking more and more out of the economy.

So you think that because is snowed for 2 weeks just before Christmas that hit the construction sector for the whole quarter. By that measure if we had a winter like 1963 then the entire construction industry would collapse.

I think you need to get real, the government is not going to be able to contain the riots/civil disorder by the end of this year the way things are going.

Asim January 26, 2011

report reply to Asim

with the price increase i am now cycling to work most days. it is cheaper but not safer, i hope it works out well. there is only one way to beat the whole pricve issue. DON'T BUY PETROL FOR A WEEK. The cookie will crumble eventually.

also this site is the best.

Mitchell January 26, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Stuart ,

If your spending it in your fuel tank, you are still spendin it.

Biggest contributor was a halt in construction work during the weather , and as a result the £ got hammered yesterday so you can expect things to keep rising.

If your going to whine about this then do something about it rather than spouting garbage like that.

Stuart January 25, 2011

report reply to Stuart

There we go, Mervyn King says it all. We must all expect to suffer equally. The Bank of England will not allow wages to keep up with inflation. He himself has not accepted a pay rise for the next two years and will have to get by on £302,000 a year. As he says we all must suffer

I think most of us could say that with some conviction if we had to survive on only £300k a year.

Oh and the 0.5% negative growth was due to the snow nothing to do with the fact that we havent got anything left to spend as its all going in the fuel tank.

Keep on smiling whilst your bending over

Mitchell January 25, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Diesel prices down 2.5% in $T terms this morning on platts. Hopefully we have seen it peak for now.

Arthur ,

BP ended exclusive supply contracts with sainsburys , they still supply the majority of sainsburys fuel. This is fact.

John Mcgrergor January 25, 2011

report reply to John Mcgrergor

When are the fuel protests starting,I will certainly be joining them, we all must stand together to put a stop to this obscene taxation.Lets get organised !

John Carpenter January 24, 2011

report reply to John Carpenter

I think it should be pointed out to the public that allthough the rise in VAT is a extra cost to private individuals it is not a extra cost to companies as they can normally reclaim VAT from the government. The increase in fuel duty is a extra cost to all motorists!

Kenneth. B January 24, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

Arthur, perhaps you're right.
300 Million? 230 million of them the result of inbreeding. "I'd like to introduce you to my wife and sister", (and there's only one woman standing there).

Ah, MURCO: Speak as I find. Best fuel I've ever used, and my fuel of choice whenever I can find it that is.
I avoid supermarket fuel like the plague, 90% fuel 10% froth (additives).

Arthur January 24, 2011

report reply to Arthur

#210 Mitchell

As I said, BP's contract to supply Sainsbury's ended a year ago.

The additive variations is widely known these days - 'better' fuel from Oilco branded forecourts (provided it hasn't been mixed with bunker fuel dross) versus supermarkets.

The ownership of refineries is hugely relevant - its a massive overhead that needs to have somewhere to send its production to. BP don't have that overhead and therefore have greater flexibility in their operations (e.g. exiting the UK retail market altogether would be very easy).

Plenty of refineries for sale in the UK - ask Shell, Total, Chevron, Murco........you can have 'em all!

Mitchell January 24, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

BP still has a supply contract with sainsburys and fuel is still delivered in BP branded tankers when on the same fuelling routes . The only difference between the fuels at the respective forecourts are the detergent levels in the fuel.

Refineries are pretty irrelevant nowadays as all fuel companies buy their fuel at all refineries , tankers are simply directed to different fuelling points depending on their brand and additives are added into the fuel at this point which becomes the only real difference in the quality of the fuel.

Arthur January 24, 2011

report reply to Arthur

# 208 Kenneth

The number of times it crops up, maybe our pop. is 300mill?!

# 207 Mitchell

Ah now, if you worked directly for BP you would probably know that BP stopped supplying Sainsbury's in January 2010!

My comment was more about their exit from Grangemouth and Coryton anyway.

Kenneth. B January 24, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

#206
Arthur is spot on, B.P sold it's last remaining U.K refinery in 2007 to Swiss-based Petroplus group in a $1.4bn deal.
If we go to a B.P petrol station we can get "Nectar" (Sainsbury's rewards) points there.
Post 204 Pedro, or is it the recycled Cliff Thurrell, why do you keep this sh1te going? zzzZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
300 million? zzzzzzzzZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzz

Wake me up when the people who keep on posting this cr@p realise that Britain only has a population of between 60 + 70 million, of which only around 30 million are motorists in any form. Pyramid e-mail scamming.

Mitchell January 24, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Arthur,

I work indirectly for BP , they supply all of sainsburys fuel.

Arthur January 24, 2011

report reply to Arthur

#205 Stuart

"Where do you think Asda et all get their fuel from, oh thats right BP and Esso."

This is often quoted as the reason for de-bunking the ludicrous idea that Pedro recycled (its been around for at least 10 years!) but its not actually true in the case of BP - they don't have a refinery in the UK.

For all sorts of other reasons though, the boycott notion is pathetically stupid........

Stuart January 24, 2011

report reply to Stuart

NO WAY PEDRO

Where do you think Asda et all get their fuel from, oh thats right BP and Esso. So all that happens is that BP and Esso say ok we'll just shut down our garages and the rest can hike the price up cause there will be less choice. You might also have drive another 5miles to fill up cause your local garage just shut down.

High fuel prices will stay until the demand drops below supply, which may take another big (continuing) round of recession. Anything else is merely urinating in the breeze.

Pedro1874 January 24, 2011

report reply to Pedro1874


We are hitting £1.29 a litre in some areas now and soon we will be faced with paying £1.50 per litre. So Philip Hollsworth offered this good idea:

This makes MUCH MORE SENSE than the 'don't buy petrol on a certain day campaign' that was going around last April or May! The oil companies just laughed at that because they knew we wouldn't continue to hurt ourselves by refusing to buy petrol. It was more of an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them. BUT, whoever thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can really work.

Please read it and join in!

Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have conditioned us to think that the cost of a litre is CHEAP, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that BUYERS - not sellers control the market place. With the price of petrol going up more each day, we consumers need to take action. The only way we are going to see the price of petrol come down is if we hit someone in the pocket by not purchasing their petrol! And we can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves. Here's the idea:

For the rest of this year DON'T purchase ANY petrol from the two biggest oil companies (which now are one) i.e. ESSO and BP.


If they are not selling any petrol, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If they reduce their prices, the other companies will have to follow suit. But to have an impact we need to reach literally millions of Esso and BP petrol buyers. It's really simple to do!!

Now, don't wimp out on me at this point... keep reading and I'll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!

I am sending this note to a lot of people. If all of you send it to at least ten more (30 x 10 = 300)....and those 300 send it to at least ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000) ... and so on. By the time the message reaches the sixth generation of people, we will have reached over THREE MILLION consumers! If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends each, then 30 million people will have been contacted! If it goes one level further, you guessed it.....

THREE HUNDRED MILLION PEOPLE!!!

Again, all YOU have to do is send this to 10 people. That's all (and not buy at ESSO/BP). How long would all that take? If each of us sends this email out to ten more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!! Acting together we can make a difference. If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on.

PLEASE HOLD OUT UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES It's easy to make this happen. Just forward this email, and buy your petrol at Shell,Asda,Tesco, Sainsburys, Morrisons, Jet etc. i.e. Boycott BP and Esso

Arthur January 24, 2011

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#201 Richard

"Am i right in thinking that the tax is applied to fuel when its sold and not when the petrol station has it delivered"

No, that is incorrect. The fuel is paid for by the customer (petrol station) inclusive of Duty and VAT on the due date after delivery - typically between 0 and 28 days.

May Be Of Help January 23, 2011

report reply to May Be Of Help

Quentin Willson is backing a campaign to get fuel down....unable to promote the web site but i am sure a bit of searching and you will be able to find it....

Richard Lyons January 23, 2011

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Am i right in thinking that the tax is applied to fuel when its sold and not when the petrol station has it delivered, so in effect the fuel in the garage tanks is untaxed till the point of sale. I seem to remember that in years gone by we had a budget at say 3pm in the afternoon and any fuel tax increase started at 6pm ???

Keith January 21, 2011

report reply to Keith

In response to the vast pool of amazingly simple minded posts on this blog, I offer this explanation of high fuel prices (mind you, it's all relative) from the Daily Mash. It certainly contains more sense than say, post 199:

THE global surge in the price of oil has been blamed on pixies, sprites and their gang of magical woodland friends.





Naughty pixie! Back to the zoo with you!As the cost of Brent crude approaches $100 a bucket, international experts and the media have been puzzled by the recent price jumps.

Bill McKay, Professor of Oil Price Rises at Glasgow Clyde University, said: "Reserves are at normal levels and oil wells are not being blown up by terrorists or Americans or even destroyed by oddly named hurricanes.

"We looked at every possible scenario and were left with one unavoidable conclusion: cheeky pixies."

He added: "Supported by an extensive network of sprites, nymphs and fairies, the pixies are infiltrating stock market computers and changing all the numbers."

According to Professor McKay the creatures then run amok across petrol station forecourts changing the big price sign you can see from the road and fiddling with the pumps.

"They're ever so cheeky and naughty, while at the same time doing untold damage to the economic system that guarantees our well being," he said.

"If you see a pixie or a sprite you must catch it, put it in a jar and give it to the zoo."

Professor McKay stressed that the price rises are, "absolutely nothing to do with a bunch of profiteering sh*ts".

Dave Pashley January 21, 2011

report reply to Dave Pashley

What we the motorist need to do is protest by refusing to buy fuel from a certain supplier say BP when they see their profits drop they may have second thoughts of ripping us off

Coyote January 21, 2011

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Mitchelll,

I did say many people will disagree and yes you may be right we may have another 200 years, or not??? Who knows but the outcome is the same overpopulation is already putting the cost of food and fuel up and this is just the start. Is the price going to come down again that is the question? I can't see how it can while demand is constantly increasing. So you can say my point of view is rubbish if you like, however I am not just talking about oil here!!!

Food is already in short supply in poorer areas of the world and price increases like the ones we have seen recently will only mean more and more people will die of starvation. The UK's increasing population means that it can only produce 50-60% of the food requirements of the Countries population so the shortage has to be imported from elsewhere. Have you seen all the natural disasters we have had in the past few years all affecting food production. Keep denying all you want but facts are facts!

Pip January 21, 2011

report reply to Pip

I have recently converted my Astra 5 to LPG. I find NO loss in power, and NO loss in MPG! OK it cost the best part of £1.800 but in 12,000 miles per year, at present prises, I will get this back in 16 months! I recommend this change to the house.
I think manufacturers should offer LPG as an option, but none seem to be keen on this - why? Could it be collusion with the Fuel companies? NAH SHIRLEY(?) NOT!!!!

Mitchelll January 21, 2011

report reply to Mitchelll

Coyote ,

I have never read such rubbish. Do you really think that the popular opinion of oil being a finite resource has anything to do with todays pricing? It was just as finite 3 years ago when diesel was $1500 per ton , today it is $850.

Believe me there is no danger of us ever running out of fossil fuels within any of our lifetimes, and as long as technology and exploration runs at the same rate , its very hard to see an end to fossill fuels in the next 200 years. Peak oil as a theory is outdated and doesnt take into account a massive number of factors, as an example in 1963 subscribers to the theory repeatedly made predictions as to when global peak oil would occur, only to revise them. Predictions have been made for 2000, 2005 and 2010. Abiogenic theory seems to becoming more accepted every year.

Supply restrictions resulting from Opec / Russia policy and geo political events have by far the biggest part to play along with the gambling of speculators and hedge funds. Also a big player is the fact that the £ in your pocket is worth 30% less than 4 years ago against the dollar

Arnold January 21, 2011

report reply to Arnold

193

I fail to see how oil production is a side issue but as you wish.

If you dont want to pay fuel duty how do you want to pay the tax. At the end of the day if the Government need to raise £500 billion in tax and they currently take say £100 billion in fuel duty (i dont know the figures) would you prefer to pay the extra on food/income tax/council tax/road tax. The Government really dont care how you pay as long as you do. Fuel duty is simply an easy way of collecting it.

Coyote January 21, 2011

report reply to Coyote

Well I've read a lot of comments on here and one thing that doesn't seem to have been mentioned on here is population growth - quite simply the more people in the world the more demand for its resources and unfortunately we now have too many people in the world for the resources that are left! Many people on here will disagree or think this statement is too strong, but unfortunately it's fact. If the world population was half of what it is today none of these price increases would be necessary, oil and other reserves would last much longer...

It's not a problem I think many Government's are strong enough to control. So this problem will continue to get worse and worse. Our way of life is going to have to change and all normal people (i.e. not rich) will from now on be worse off year on year. This could all lead to civil war or even another world war are people seeing now how serious this is? Expensive oil is only the start, lack of food will be the next problem and this will affect everyone.

Sorry for the gloom and doom, but this is the way it is! Unless we can come up with a cheaper non polluting readily available energy supply and a method for growing more food, the population growth of this planet will eventually lead to the extinction of the human race.

Kenny January 21, 2011

report reply to Kenny

#192:
Nobody is against the oil producers making a profit. A barrel of oil in the ground is better than two in the bank, but this blog is intended to raise/discuss (even complain) about whichever government is in power, constantly milking all motorists via relentless increases in fuel duty. So...................purely for the benefit of this blog, please stop bleating on about the poor oil producers and peak oil and all the other irrelevant side issues, and stick solely to the fuel duty
topic.

Arnold January 21, 2011

report reply to Arnold

Why do people not understand that oil is a limited resource? The two big international energy watchdogs (EIA and IEA) both expect demand to be higher than supply this year. Demand 89 million barrels a day and supply at 88 mpb. Simply put, not everyone is going to get the amount they want and those that do will have to pay more for it.

If you were Saudi Arabia what would you do, sit on your hands and watch your greatest resource appreciate by 15% a year or pump it out and put the money in a bank at 3% interest a year. They are doing what anybody would do, its either pay the price or don t use it. Cant afford it then tough. Its what nature is all about, survival of the fittest and under the current system the fittest are those with the most money.

Kenny January 21, 2011

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#190:

I forgot about the fuel duty increase of last October.
I'm no Tory either, and the condems didn't exactly go out of their way(as Labour did several times) to postpone the duty increases they inherited.

How much longer can the Tory's get away with blaming Labour for everything?
The multi-millionaires of all parties don't live in the real world where every penny (or five) puts immense strain on ALL transport costs.
Has anyone else noticed the runaway price increases of goods in the shops?
It may well cost us £70 to £80 to fill our modest family cars, but the way things are going it will cost £70 to £80 to fill ONE carrier bag of essential food at Tesco's.

Masterbader January 21, 2011

report reply to Masterbader

@189 Kenny; I'm no Tory, but the past 3 (april and oct '10, jan '11) fuel duty increases were all part of labours last budget- not the Condems.

Kenny January 21, 2011

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188 Mitchell:

"do people for get that under a year ago we had a 12 year old labour government who consistently and unmercifully rose fuel duty every year"?

So...................I take it that once in January and again in April, just 3 months apart, is better than:
"a 12 year old labour government who consistently and unmercifully rose fuel duty EVERY YEAR?"

Mitchell January 21, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Did you realise steve that over 60% of the average bankers bonus goes to the treasury ?

Would you rather this industry stopped and you made up the difference with tax rises from your own pocket.

Also the animosity against the conservative lib-dem coalition is hilarious , do people for get that under a year ago we had a 12 year old labour government who consistently and unmercifully rose fuel duty every year?

Steve Jones January 21, 2011

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185

I'm depressed about the future too, along with many other hard pressed folks in this country. It seems that the bankers aren't though! If they were made to pay their bonuses to the treasury, seeing as they caused the economic woes, tax on fuel could be lowered.
Cameron and Osborne need to grow a pair and clobber the Bankers - not the paupers. I think they are scared of the likes of "Fred the Shred" and Bob Diamond etc.
I've had to cut right down on car usage as I resent the fact that I am butt raped by Georgie Boy every time the pump nozzle goes into my car and the price display on the pump looks more like a pinball machine scoreboard!
However - I dont think any amount of moaning and groaning is going to get cheaper petrol though, nor cheaper gas and electric. After all - We're all in this together (Except the Bankers that is)!
What would I do without Asda SmartPrice Cornflakes and Instant Coffee - long gone are the days I could afford Kelloggs and Nescafe lol

Ann Battson January 20, 2011

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20/1/11 I have just seen that my local garage near Hay on Wye has hiked its diesel price to £136.09. What is being done to curb this burden on rural areas? Just before Xmas I had to have a central heating oil delivery that cost me £120 more than it did exactly a year ago. There is no provision for gas in my village. As a pensioner living in Wales I need my car to get around due to an infrequent bus service & it is 10 miles to my nearest supermarket. I take pride in maintaining my independence & not using any resources more than is necessary but am feeling more and more depressed about the future.

M. January 19, 2011

report reply to M.

Boycotting a certain brand is pointless. There is not a great margin in retail selling of fuel, hence why Total uk is selling it's retail network and supply chain.

With the forecourt making 2-4ppl profit then your not going to get 20ppl knocked off are you?

Now when your duty is 58.95pl +VAT then there is scope for 20ppl to be knocked off but as others have correctly pointed out the revenue lost would need to be collected elsewere.

C Evans January 19, 2011

report reply to C Evans

Join the campaign on FACEBOOK

search FACEBOOK for : Stop the rip off

C Evans January 19, 2011

report reply to C Evans

Join the campaign to CUT FUEL TAX

search on Causes dot com for keep fuel below £1 per litre

Paul January 18, 2011

report reply to Paul

Wouldn't it be nice for a change for people to stop arguing and being sanctimonious.
We are all being affected some way or another but all people seem to do is constantly bicker about things.
Some commenter's are dead right that any attempt at protests is futile,and until people stick together then nothing will ever change.

Andrew January 18, 2011

report reply to Andrew

Add Petrol Price as a Friend on Facebook and lets start a protest to reduce the cost of our petrol.

Barry January 18, 2011

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175. They would but they cant afford the fuel to go anywhere :-)

Arthur January 18, 2011

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#175 Peter

Doh! If you're going to post something why don't you say something that supports your views?

"Arthur/ Mitchell/Kenneth...You three need to get out more lol..."

My kids and their friends send each other more interesting text messages - and they're not even teenagers yet!

Mitchell January 18, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Also Kenneth is right on this one, Esso do supply tesco. BP supply Sainsburys. Asda will buy from a refinery owned by a major also. Morrisons are supplied by UK Fuels Group , another major european oil company.

Shell are a bigger company than both BP and Esso.

Not buying from BP and Esso would mean approx 2000 UK sites boycotted. Only 12000 others to choose from.

Mitchell January 18, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Peter ,

Your just the latest in a long line of people to crop up on here who has little clue and unable to see the picture beyond his own pocket.

Fuel Duty increases have had very little to do with the meteoric price rise seen in the last 12 months. The wholesale cost of the fuel has become over $300 per ton more expensive since March.

Unless you feel like you have some information that can interupt the current mood of the markets and lower price , i suggest you stop whining on here and get on with it as obviously you are out of your depth with this argument.

Kenneth. B January 18, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

167?
Who's dusted this cr@p off and brought it back to the surface again?
As Arthur says in 169, there's between 60 + 70 million people in Britain, so where's the other (we've guessed it) 230 to 240 million people you speak of?
As for "boycott Esso & B.P", I've seen Esso lorries delivering fuel to Tesco
stores. Who'll be the first to say "they contract their deliveries out"?
162 & 164 etc, Dave Cameron, George Osborne. You weren't funny to start with, and you're going down hill fast with the pathetic attempts you're making at humour.

Arthur January 18, 2011

report reply to Arthur

#170 Peter

A poor workman blames his tools.......

So you're less clever than your iPhone - what an admission!

Still waiting for you to say when I said fuel was "too cheap".

"I'll vote for you at the next local election matey"

I imagine you'll struggle - I'm not standing in any elections and the chances of me me being 'local' to you are slim.

"we shud be paying double this and politicians are not greedy , low moralistic pigs"

Nice mangling of the English language there - what are you trying to say?

Peter, calm down and try and collect your thoughts.

Peter James January 17, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Arthur, im actually good at spelling, problem is I'm typing on my iPhone and for one it self corrects/misspells stuff and my eyes ain't what they used to be, thus, dodgy spelling..doesn't help Im writing tonking up the m1 in my hummer truck using up bags of " cheap fuel" to boot... You know what, your intellectual influence has won me over, yes fuel is far too cheap, we shud be paying double this and politicians are not greedy , low moralistic pigs....who cares about folks livelihoods... Nice one... 95% of the driving population are wrong.... I'll vote for you at the next local election matey....I think I'm starting to like you..

Arthur January 17, 2011

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#168 Peter

SURELY YOU should be EMBARRASSED at your spelling? At least #158 is prepared to accept reality and not look to blame everyone else. What do you propose with your towering intellect?

#167 Cliff

Interesting to see that 10 year old spam surface again - I thought we'd seen the last of it. Just think it through - good start point being what the population of the UK is and "the two biggest oil companies (which now are one)"!

Peter James January 17, 2011

report reply to Peter James

"158..j9007"

Mental age of a 3 year old. .. Surley your embarassed at posting that comment on here..muppet... Are your arthurs rent boy by any chance...? Tw£t.....

Cliff Thurrell January 17, 2011

report reply to Cliff Thurrell

THIS SOUNDS LIKE A REALLY GOOD IDEA, IF EVERYONE WAS TO DO IT....


Dear All,
Petrol Boycott of Esso & BP

I thought I saw this idea last year but if it had enough support it could have an effect.

Please see what you think and pass it on if you agree with it.

We are hitting £1.35 a litre in some areas now and soon we will be faced with paying £1.50 per litre. So Philip Hollsworth offered this good idea:

This makes MUCH MORE SENSE than the 'don't buy fuel on a certain day campaign' that was going around last April or May! The oil companies just laughed at that because they knew we wouldn't continue to hurt ourselves by refusing to buy fuel. It was more of an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them. BUT, whoever thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can really work.

Please read it and join in!

Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have conditioned us to think that the cost of a litre is CHEAP, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that BUYERS - not sellers control the market place. With the price of fuel going up more each day, we consumers need to take action. The only way we are going to see the price of fuel come down is if we hit someone in the pocket by not purchasing their fuel! And we can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves. Here's the idea:

For the rest of this year DON'T purchase ANY fuel from the two biggest oil companies (which now are one) i.e. ESSO and BP.

If they are not selling any fuel, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If they reduce their prices, the other companies will have to follow suit. But to have an impact we need to reach literally millions of Esso and BP fuel buyers. It's really simple to do!!

Now, don't wimp out on me at this point... keep reading and I'll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!

I am sending this note to a lot of people. If all of you send it to at least ten more (30 x 10 = 300)....and those 300 send it to at least ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000) ... and so on. By the time the message reaches the sixth generation of people, we will have reached over THREE MILLION consumers! If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends each, then 30 million people will have been contacted! If it goes one level further, you guessed it.....

THREE HUNDRED MILLION PEOPLE!!!

Again, all YOU have to do is send this to 10 people. That's all (and not buy at ESSO/BP). How long would all that take? If each of us sends this email out to ten more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!! Acting together we can make a difference. If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on.

PLEASE HOLD OUT UNTIL THEY LOWER THEIR PRICES It's easy to make this happen. Just forward this email, and buy your fuel at Shell,Asda,Tesco, Sainsburys, Morrisons, Jet etc. i.e. Boycott BP and Esso


Rob January 17, 2011

report reply to Rob

If I could post something a little more on topic, and not try and be a comedian who can't spell...

I drive a Land Rover. It does about 27mpg and I'm going through about £70 a week in diesel. I don't drive a Lamd Rover because I want to, I drive it because I need to. A Toyota Prius won't tow 3 tonnes, nor will it get itself out of a muddy field. I can't afford to buy a cheap runabout to nip into town, so I'm responsible for another 4x4 clogging up the streets.

Surely the fat cats in charge realise that not everyone can drive ecoboxes and actually have 4x4s for a reason, and can't afford all these fuel price increases?

If it wasn't for the police regularly dipping tanks I'd run it on red diesel.

Everyone Aged 7+ January 17, 2011

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164 Dave

"johnston"

"transportaion"

"rember"

"there regards"

"too let"

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ....................

Vic January 17, 2011

report reply to Vic

162 George

"extremly"

"exspense"

"lovley"

"to pay for my cost"

"esculator"

No need for the tissues until your balls drop, sonny.......

J9007 January 16, 2011

report reply to J9007

YOU LOT NEED TO GET AFF UR ARSES AND START WALKING OR BUSING IT TO WORK IN FUTURE INSTEAD OF MOANING ABOUT FUEL PRICES. HIGH PRICES ARE HERE TO STAY TILL ALL THE OIL HAS DRIED UP YOU NEED TO START ADDAPTING NOW!! YOU HAD UR GOOD TIMES NOW YOU MUST LIVE UP TO IT NOW ITS THE SH#TIE TIME SADLY.

Bob J January 15, 2011

report reply to Bob J

@155

Mostly people queueing to top their already nearly full tanks up....

Susan L January 15, 2011

report reply to Susan L

Im all for the fuel protests, but a small request could you let us know when they are going to happen so we can fill our tanks. It was such a pain last time waiting in a queue for hours.

Richard January 15, 2011

report reply to Richard

Yet another duty increase!! when will it end?

I am really getting fed up to the back teeth with all what has happened over the last year. Am I the only one that feels it is starting to become unfair.

Enough is enough, instead of placing the burden on working class folk trying their best to make ends meet, how about taking some extra cash from those that caused the mess in the first place.

Inflation is just a further tax on those on low incomes. Fuel duty is just an easy way to say that the government is tackling global warming.


Kennedy January 15, 2011

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147:
How do you manage to post a comment when in one hand you have a wad of tissue, and the other hand is extremely busy?

Vic January 14, 2011

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George 147

David 149

An opportunity for satire and humour sadly missed. Try harder or not at all. These blogs could do with some laughs - unfortunately you're not delivering.

Vic January 14, 2011

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Jay 148

"I think".

Not judging by the content of your illiterate post you don't......

Jay Mclaughlin January 14, 2011

report reply to Jay Mclaughlin

I think the prices of petrol is a rip off. they say its easy to get a job when you hav passed your test and got a car. how does the goverment expert to get so many people of the dhss and get them to work when the fuel prices have gone up and how do they expect people to get to work and pay there bills and stuff i think we should block garages and stop fuel tanks going to garage to see how they feel when they anit earning a living and paying there bill and goes for the goverment i think they get enough money but again what does it get spent on oooh yeah nothing we want... PROTEST ALL THE WAY AND f**k THE LAW they just waste company fuel

Kennedy January 14, 2011

report reply to Kennedy

I've just looked into my reliable (if slightly cracked) crystal ball, and this is what's going to happen:
In the budget in March, Boy George Osborne will announce that the planned duty increase on April 1st will we scrapped (Sun readers will be patting themselves on the back, shaking hands and drinking cheap champagne) and everyone will forget the duty increase of January 1st & V.A.T increase of January 4th, and think that they've "won".
Secondly: The Fair Fuel Stabilizer" will be introduced, but only when (and not until) the petrol/diesel price reaches £1.50 ltr, where the price will be pegged, and reviewed twice a year in the Autumn budget statement and again in the main budget of March/April the following year.
We will be all led down the garden path thinking we are the victors when in reality it will be the opposite. We will be shafted either way, so lie back, think of England or take it via the back passage.
Everybody will THINK they've won, but WHO will be the REAL WINNERS?
Answers on the back of a postage stamp, together with all the promises any politician has ever kept.

Mitchell January 14, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Texaco indeed own very few forecourts as this was the direction they took 10 years ago+ and accounts for their lack of strategic ( Motorway and large a road) sites.

The supermarkets buy their fuel from refineries owned by exxon , bp , shell and chevron so the idea that boycotting branded sites will create a squeeze is a falacy, simply harming the small business owners and franchisees who own stations.

All of the oil majors own less the 40% of their forecourts and the ones they do tend do be services or the larger sites.

Arthur is right about the competition in the UK fuel market, Total are planning on selling all UK assets to gazprom in russia, so a new name could emerge soon and it would be interesting to see their pricing stance.

Evans, its clear to all here you are remedial.

C Evans January 14, 2011

report reply to C Evans

141. YOU are the one with no idea what's happening. Typical of the British public. Now go away to the planet you live on.

Arthur January 14, 2011

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#122 Peter

"Fuel too cheap eh Arthur, why do you post on here mate ?" Let me know where I said that Peter. If you can't be bothered to read others posts then don't comment on them.
"I've seen 4 petrol stations go bust near me and why?, coz they charged too much for fuel and folk stopped filling up there". Utter nonsense. If they went bust it is because fuel retailing in the UK is hugely competitive and they couldn't compete with the predatory pricing of the supermarkets.
"aš other posters suggest why not boycott esso, texaco and all the big boys". The more sensible question is 'why?'. They have no scope to cut their prices so what are you going to achieve? Texaco don't even own any petrol stations and are trying to sell their refinery!

#138 Dave & #140 C Evans. Why do you have this childlike view of what Government is? C Evans seems to believe that it is a big monster in cupboard gobbling up all his money: "we are ripped off by our own government and exploited to the max to line their pockets." Are you a 'toff' with vast inheirited wealth? No need for the health service, free education, roads and so on that the rest of us have? I'll happily consider joining your campaign for lower tax when you have explained what services you want to cut or the alternative way you will raise the lost revenue.

"We are a third world country now". You need to get out and travel a bit more my friend.....

Dave: OK, you admit you're happy to paying the current level of tax: "The government would get their tax in increased revenue due to increased spending elsewhere.", but I don't see how me spending the, say, £10 I save on my fill up gets to the Government just because I go and spend that £10 on some tat down the shops. Notwithstanding that I'd rather save the £10 (I think you'll find spending instead of saving played a part in creating the current economic mess), even if I spend the £10 on something that is vatable the Government will only get £2 - so I'll need to dip into my savings and spend another £40. This isn't sounding like much of a plan!
"If the powers that be took a step back, dropped the fuel tax" then "Production costs would go down, this would be good for exports as we could undercut other countries": How much would fuel tax have to go down for us to be able to compete with China on TV manufacturing? What % of the price of finished goods produced in this country is fuel tax? OK Dave, you don't know - maybe the 'No Sense Party' would be a better name.

Mitchell January 14, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

The last 5 posts , probably sum up the usual lack of knowledge on this site.

C Evans, seriously please stop your idiotic rantic on here and pop a letter to Jeremy Clarkson or a journalist from some other red top. You have nothing constructive to add , along with the fact its blatent that you have no idea about what is happening.

You are another who is just making noises and not actually doing anything. Fuel protests will not have the desired effect. Its unlikely we will ever see diesel fall below £1.20 a litre for the forseeable future.

C Evans January 14, 2011

report reply to C Evans

These greedy, power crazed parasites would charge you for the air you breathe if they could find a way to do it!!!
I say play them at their own game and we will win. If people got their act together and protest It will have the desired effect as it did before.
This situation cannot go on.

Dave Jones January 14, 2011

report reply to Dave Jones

Fuel protests wont happen, All that is happening is the prices are putting the lower paid people off the road and making driving an exclusive pleasure for the rich. Disabled people will struggle as they get little money anyway and so will become house bound. People in the rural areas that have no choice than use a car will become house bound. Unlike big cities that have tubes, trams and buses at reasonable costs, in the sticks you get over inflated bus charges, very few services or extremely costly taxes. By the end of the year lots of people will be working just to pay to get to work and so they will end up better off unemployed. If the powers that be took a step back, dropped the fuel tax, then prices would also fall in shops. People would again have money in their pockets to spend shopping and on leisure. Pubs may stand a chance. Production costs would go down, this would be good for exports as we could undercut other countries. Lower paid jobs would not be so much of an issue as the cost of living would be lower. The government would get their tax in increased revenue due to increased spending elsewhere. If it stays high then I think that rural dwellers, mobility disabled should get the fuel at reduced costs as they have no real alternative. Public transport/Taxis and Hauliers should also get a tax break so as to drop the price of goods in the shops and give people who are lucky enough to have proper public transport a cost effective alternative.

The only way to stop this joke is to create your own party, say the common sense party, where the ministers are not all rich, don't all come from the same class at Eaton and are not members of the jolly boys club. Get paid a normal wage and have to pay income tax on it, have to be at every meeting in parliament, not when they can be bothered, stop wasting money creating a nanny state and do what they are supposed to do and act in the interest of the people not themselves and big business. The reason gas and electric is so expensive is they sold the utilities off to foreign powers, closed the coal mines and destroyed most of them, as at the time coal was cheaper from abroad, so we have no choice but to pay the inflated prices now, couldn't see that one coming. Oh then they introduce the fuel tax escalator, who labour are being blamed for on the news, wish they would get their facts right as to who brought it in.

Another thing that annoys me is they insist you have motor insurance and have an insurance premium tax on that. Soon you will have a birth tax to go with the death tax and tax on condoms as that's for pleasure and lets tax the air whilst we are at it!!

C Evans January 13, 2011

report reply to C Evans

Government do not give a damn about you or i. It's a them and us situation and we owe it to ourselves to protest against this vile ripp-off. We are a third world country now.
They could easily reduce the extortionate tax on fuel but we are easy targets and until we stop being "victims" they will continue with teir plan.
Anyone for methanol???

Barry January 13, 2011

report reply to Barry

133

Its tough but there are always alternatives its just not alway s there are better alternatives.

As you say driving is the best way for you to manage but the cost is having to pay for the fuel. Not every question has a good answer.

What can the Government do answer: very little

We are only doomed if we cannot adapt, which will not be easy

Special K January 13, 2011

report reply to Special K

It's serious now!

I as many other people in this crumbling nation have made massive cut backs to our spending exploring all possible areas of our normal overheads to cut back on unessacary spending.

However, something I have been unable to cut back on any further as the costs still continue to escalate out of control is - FUEL !!

I like many others, live in a rural area isolated from public or any other method of transport - except the motor car! I need a car to get to work a mere 12 miles away. However, I cannot cycle as the additional time added on each end of my working day / shift would mean I would be about an hour late for picking up my children (x4) from school.

I am now reaching the point where fuel costs are now equatng each month to nearly 50% of my monthly net income !! Absolute joke (wrong - sick). There is news of further increases to the cost of fuel to nearly 1.50 per litre very soon?

IT WILL BE A CASE THEN OF - CAN I AFFORD TO GET TO WORK??

WILL THE GOVERNMENT PAY ME A BENEFIT OR MEET ALL COSTS AS I HAND IN MY RESIGNATION AT WORK WITH THE REASON OF "I CAN NO LONGER AFFORD TO WORK HERE". Note, I have had no increase to my salary for the last 3 YEARS - SET TO BE A FOURTH IN 2011 as the country continuess as every other country to wallow in recession.

Are we soon all to be doomed ???

Lucy Brooke January 12, 2011

report reply to Lucy Brooke

I<m singel mum on mimmine wage. I need my car for every thing work and school run, but now i am think i will just have to get ried of my car as i and keep the tank even half full i and even got a big car , it makes me sick i cant keep my famliy going as it is with out the tax . we have to do some thing about this its getting made,

Peter James January 12, 2011

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"128" Mitchell
Brilliant retort, pure genius, a1 brahmas to work ha ha, now those things are thirsty, if you want a laugh, you tube " British army tank at mcdonalds" being ex forces that tickled me, hope you enjoy it too!

Mitchell January 12, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Platts 5 day lag price jumped up 1.2 for anyone who will be buying on thursday.

Diesel at the forecourts will be £1.35 average by the 24th Jan and i imagine it will hit £1.50 in the Shetlands.

In terms of taxation we are getting away fairly lightly compared to other countries in europe , the nordic ones in particular!

The US model of taxation seems to be a little more desirable right now , obviously with ammendments to fit our NHS system and social security.

Barry January 12, 2011

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128

Wasnt going into too much detail just trying to get my point accross. You could exchange my figures however you want and of course include housing etc. but the point still stands.

Its all very well wanting a tax cut on one thing but if its raised elsewhere (which it will have to be) you wont necessarily be any better off, and maybe worse off.

Driving a tank to work, now that could be fun, wouldnt need to worry about traffic jams although as you say fuel could get a bit expensive lol

Mitchell January 12, 2011

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Barry

Do you not pay any rent / mortgage?

Unless you have a large family barry £20+ per day on food seems a little excessive.

Also £150 on fuel? Are you driving an A1 Abrams to work?

Barry January 12, 2011

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no 126

Ok so we all protest about the fuel taxes.

So the Government removes all tax from fuel. 50 p litre and everyones happy. However there is now no money to pay for road repairs, hospitals, schools, bankers bonuses (maybe not such a bad thing) so they have to raise tax elsewhere.

How would you now like to pay the same amount of tax. Perhaps a tax on food, council tax rises by 500% etc. At the end of the day it amounts to the same thing.

If you earn £500 a week and you pay : £150 fuel, £150 food,£100 other tax, £100 disposable. Are you then better off if you now pay £50 fuel, £200 food, £150 other tax, £100 disposable?

I would rather have cheaper food and more expensive fuel because at the end of the day i can do without fuel in the car but not without food.

C Evans January 12, 2011

report reply to C Evans

Fact. The actual cost of the petrol in your tank is about 50 Pence a Litre, thats very reasonable.
Whats NOT reasonable is the way we are ripped off by our own government and exploited to the max to line their pockets.
When are the British people going to say enough is enough? Why don't the British realise that they hold the real power by standing together.

Kellerman January 11, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

He has a point about the Audi drivers though. The cócks of the road seem to have ditched Beamers for Audis. I sure wouldn't cycle or use a moped or motorbike on the roads near me.

Keith January 11, 2011

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Post 122

''I've an appointment in London Tom at 3pm, I'll take your advice bloggers and get on my bike, should arrive by three if I set off now, that's if I'm not killed by an Audi driver enroute!''

And you still don't think that fuel is cheap? Look at what you get for your money! You don't have to leave home at 8.45pm for your appointment, value or what!

Kellerman January 11, 2011

report reply to Kellerman

Keith, #121: Point taken. I've been on this blog a fair few years, and I should know by now that there are plenty of morons on here who would make primary school kids weep at their ignorance.

Sadly, it's not just energy blogs that these people haunt with perpetual motion devices. They even get venture capitalists gullible enough to part with their cash involved. Y'know, because the idea of promising unlimited energy for a million bucks has never crossed a conman's mind before.

Peter James January 11, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Fuel too cheap eh Arthur, why do you post on here mate ? Oh your winding us up yeah...ill take a guess your retired ( fair play on that score) and not using your car doent bother you or your rich...please get in tune with us That High fuel price take food from our tables and will, yes will destroy our economic growth, fact my friend...now I've seen 4 petrol stations go bust near me and why?, coz they charged too much for fuel and folk stopped filling up there , could argue not their fault as their independents , aš other posters suggest why not boycott esso, texaco and all the big boys but that may give supermarkets opportunity to hike up their prices... Politicians are bare faced liars and care about themselves only! " cheap fuel" ha ha I've an appointment in London Tom at 3pm, I'll take your advice bloggers and get on my bike, should arrive by three if I set off now, that's if I'm not killed by an Audi driver enroute! Students protesting over uni fees , my arse, motorists unite...does anyone know if emergancy service vehicles get fuel rebates? Funny but never seen a cop car or fire engine in my local esso?

Keith January 11, 2011

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POST 120

Kellerman, you would be best visiting your wrath on Phil, the numpty that Mitchell was referring to. Phil has managed to insult anyone with intelligence in excess of slugs, Mitchell only got to you:)

I am not trying to be unkind, it's just that there are so many div's on here and Mitchell probably isn't one of them.

Kellerman January 11, 2011

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Mitchell, #92: As an ACTUAL biologist working for a CRO near Cambridge, I find your insinuation that the natural science crowd are ignorant of basic physical principles quite insulting. Anyone who actually has taken a degree in biology will tell you that the very first lectures are entropy and thermodynamics 101.

So no, he's not a biologist. You don't even need secondary school science to know you can't get energy without expending energy or that it is always finite.

J Moore January 11, 2011

report reply to J Moore

"become used to cheap fuel"
Fuel has never been cheap in UK. We have always been ripped off more than anyone in europe due to extortionate tax imposed.
Lets get it straight the actual fuel cost is very reasonable. The tax robbed from us is disgusting.

Barry January 11, 2011

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no 116

I know that those living in the countryside have a rougher deal but the real problem is that as a country we have become used to cheap fuel. There are alternatives to burning petrol/diesel but they are either more expensive ie electric or less convienient ie riding a bike or walking. The fact is if there was a cheaper/better way to get about then we would switch but there isnt so we have to pay the price. If electric becomes cheaper then people will switch but at the minute its not.

no 115 lol gotta keep smiling

Arthur January 11, 2011

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#115

Nice one Keith! Not sure many on here appreciate satire though - they'll mainly think you're serious and want to join you!

Never read so much twaddle amongst the last dozen or so posts.......

C. Flanagan January 11, 2011

report reply to C. Flanagan

Fuel prices have increased on an almost weekly basis in the town where I live (Banff, Aberdeenshire) and are today at £1.36.9 / lt for diesel.
This continual increase will result in a weakening of the areas economy, infrastructure and quality of life as people are forced to either take low paid jobs locally or, as many are doing, relocating nearer to the main source of employment which is Aberdeen - some 45 miles away where, incidentally fuel is 8 to 10 pence cheaper at the pumps. This price difference is dictated by the oil companies who 'ring' their prices in rural areas explaining it away by saying it's because of increased delivery cost - at £1600 per delivery I think not - it's legalised extortion. There is no viable public transport, there is no dispensation from the government only endless rhetoric and tax increases.
So for those of us who have no choice but to live here and drive our 4x4s because we NEED them to get around both the government and the oil companies take us for cash cows - perhaps when we all go bankrupt and the area is an economic wasteland they'll move onto YOU.

Keith January 11, 2011

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Brothers and sisters!!! It is our inalienable right to drive where we want, when we want, and at low cost.
Those criminals in OPEC have OUR oil under their sand, the big oil companies don't care about us just their big fat profits and politicians are all on the take!!!!!!! It's got to stop now we must have a huge protest and bring down the gubment and I am disabled on a pension and it just isn't fair how I am I supposed to get to hospital and how am I supposed to visit my relatives and lety's have a blockade and protest on the motorways and the greenies are wrong there is loads of oil and it'as abiotic too and the oil companies are suppressing research into alternative fuels and global warming is a great big fat con to get more money out of us and it just isn't fair!!!!!!!!!!!!
We should boycott a different oil company every day and civil servants get paid too much and hydrogen is free why can't we have that and I am so angry and I can't stay literate I'm so angry and it isn't fair I deserve better I want cheap petrol and stuff why can't I have it YOU SHOULD ALL GO OUT AND PROTEST AND ...............................

Chris C January 11, 2011

report reply to Chris C

Why does petrol & deisel have VAT at 20% when other fuels like gas and electricity have a VAT of 5%?
As Mr Cameron has suggested he wants to help motorist bashing - do you think he would be generouse and make 5% VAT on all fuels as they are not a luxury but are essential to everyone, high fuel price means high price everything else?
Whishfull thinking haha!

P Wilson January 11, 2011

report reply to P Wilson

How about a National NO petrol day. Stay away from the filling stations and watch the government sqirm and squeal at the loss of tax.
We are being exploited by these parasites and they know it.

Steve Wilson January 11, 2011

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when is this country going to unite and do something about these crazy prices
i think to get we should start a price war on these big companies and only use one fuel retailer per day and the price will soon go back down
for example bp monday texaco tues etc

M. January 11, 2011

report reply to M.

#109
"Why is it always something point NINE ? Why do the dealers never use a different last digit, even if the actual cost increase is 2.7p for instance? They always round it up to the next 0.9. We get ripped off by these thieves left and right."

No different than a shop having £9.99 instead of £10

Des January 11, 2011

report reply to Des

why are the truckers accepting this when it went above £1 a litre a couple of years ago there was hell up we need another fuel protest or a we need to have a coordinated response such as only buy from esso i week and do the same for jet another week and so on when these companies see their trade drop the prices will drop also the trouble is people buy over here because of convienience
and will not go out of ther way to shop around .
there is one garage where i live that is always 3p per litre dearer than anyone else and i refuse to use him on principle
we need to get some backbone in this country and start standing up for ourselves or the succesion of money grabbing governments and oil companies will continue to walk all over us

David Warner January 11, 2011

report reply to David Warner

Why is it always something point NINE ? Why do the dealers never use a different last digit, even if the actual cost increase is 2.7p for instance? They always round it up to the next 0.9. We get ripped off by these thieves left and right.

Eric Goldup January 11, 2011

report reply to Eric Goldup

Ministers are still proving they can not be trusted to claim expenses. The way to save is not to spend what you don't have. We mortals can only use money on the for which it is collected. Government needs to be returned to those constraints.

Brian Hughes January 11, 2011

report reply to Brian Hughes

I feel fortunate I am retired. My mileage once I first retired was 18,000 miles per year, half of what it was when working. Now, I have gradually reduced it in keeping with the huge increases in fuel costs to 8,000 a year. The money I managed to save now getting little interest, swindled out of 3 company pensions due to legislation passed in the late 1980's made such swindling legal keeps my budget down. The "baby boom" resulting from world war 2 now being used to say "people are living longer", of course they are, there are more of them, they have used that fact of the baby boom as an excuse for many things over the years. Energy is needed, for heating, lighting and travel, as well as many other things, so a soft and easy target, used by all governments throughout my life. Sadly, people mean nothing to those in power, because poer corrupts it, it seems more so with passing tears.

Anthony Frank January 11, 2011

report reply to Anthony Frank

Obviously we would all like to pay less for our fuel, but lets face it, it's not going to happen, the government (Labour or Tory) want as much tax revenue as possible combined with demand for oil from other countries so therefore it is inevitable that the price stays high.
However if you look back (although I need this confirming) in about 1970 beer was about 15 or 16 pence a pint and petrol was around 30 to 32 pence per gallon now beer varies from £2.80 to £3.00 per pint & petrol about £5.90 per gallon. I know it's no consolation to the pocket, but a gallon of petrol seem to have maintained the gap as being around twice the cost of a pint of beer. In 1970 my wage as a apprentice joiner was £6.50 Per WEEK. My earnings now as a joiner is approx £600.00 per week.
Just try the formula yourselves with other items, It might not lower the cost of fuel, but it might put things in perspective.

C Evans January 11, 2011

report reply to C Evans

The previous fuel protests had the desired effect. This is the ONLY thing government listen to. Hit them where it hurts just like they do to us.
DISGUSTING RIPP-OFF.
Next time you go to fill up, just think. This petrol costs just 50 PENCE a Litre, all the rest is TAX stright into their pockets. Stop being victims!!!!!!

C Evans January 11, 2011

report reply to C Evans

The extortionate tax - upon - tax this greedy government impose is disgusting. The British people are being exploited to the max when it comes to running a car.
The actual cost of a Litre is about 50 PENCE, no other country in europe would stand for this.

J.mcgregor January 11, 2011

report reply to J.mcgregor

We must start organising fuel protests at all UK refineries, tax on fuel now is disgusting and where is it going to stop ! We must make a stand now as it is not going to go away, we saw the last time how quickly the country grinds to a halt.

Simon Yeomans January 10, 2011

report reply to Simon Yeomans

time the Unions started to strike and then remove the presant "idiot" goverment ,cant remember who was in power last time it was done but it has happend ,only tips i can give is
A. red diesel
B.vegi oil

Arthur January 10, 2011

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#97 #99 Barry #96 Ian

I think the debate rather goes up a blind alley with the phrase "when the oil runs out" particularly if it's associated with an observation regarding how power station workers will get to work. What clearly isn't going to happen is that we all wake up one day, set off for work and call into our local petrol station to be told - sorry, we have no fuel, the world's run out of oil!

We are talking about a process that will take years - and it is the price that will stop it being used. What is needed is investment in alternatives so that society can adapt to oil being unaffordable.

Darren January 10, 2011

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This website is RUBBISH.... it's totally inaccurate, they don't update their site on a daily basis... Please anyone reading this cancel your subscription with this outfit.. make a list of garage phone numbers close to you and call them... I saved 3p that way, as this website told me to go 4 miles away from my postcode and pay 2p extra derr.....

Barry January 10, 2011

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Didnt mean to criticise, just dont think people realise the true value of oil. Hydrogen is fine, but it currently takes more energy to release it than it produces. (where do we get that energy from)

Food is the big problem when fuel runs out, where do we get the fertiliser from. without it there will only be enough food for about 1 billion people. what is going to happen to the rest?

Nuclear power is fine for producing electricity, but would you want to fly on a nuclear powered plane and how would you feel to have thousands of potential nuclear bombs flying over your head.

Ian Bilsland January 9, 2011

report reply to Ian Bilsland

97. Fair enough. Was more of a statement rather than a question. Seems that no one is entitled to their opinion on this forum as you just get criticized. Everyone is pissed off about the duty / tax increases. I travel over 350 miles to and from work each week and am feeling the pain.

In any case, when oil runs out, we will have hydrogen powered vehicles. Have you not heard of nuclear power? - no oil required there. So we will have electricity.

Back to my original post: Government will have to find an alternative revenue from somewhere - but there again, by the time oil runs out, perhaps the vat and duty collected on fuel may have paid of some of the national debt.

OK Barry?

Barry January 9, 2011

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96

Do you really believe the Government will be able to run the country when the oil runs out? There would be no food in the shops, the electricity wouldnt last very long (how do those who work at power stations get to work). In short the last thing people would be worrying about would be how they should be paying tax so i think your question is rather irrelevent.

Ian Bilsland January 9, 2011

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Government is becoming to reliant on the revenue it gets from fuel tax & duty. What will they do when oil runs out?

Arthur January 8, 2011

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#94 Margaret

The pumps round both up and down and depending on the amount dispensed. There is no overall benefit to the retailer - no extra profit. Also note that (I think) pumps still say "minimum delivery 5 litres"?

Margaret Clarke January 8, 2011

report reply to Margaret Clarke

Can someone explain to me why petrol prices are advertised to one decimal place ie 127.9p per litre. They obviously can't charge us that. When i filled my car yesterday i stopped the pump at exactly 1 litre and the price read £1.28. All these .1p's must add up to quite an extra profit.

Nigel January 7, 2011

report reply to Nigel

Fuel duty is spiralling out of control & as others have already rightly pointed out will wreck the recovery, we will pay extra for everything because of it.

Mr Cameron said when he was campaigning that he would introduce a fuel duty stabilizer so when fuel went up he would drop the rate of vat on fuel, then when it went back down he put it back up. Well it was reported this week that he has now said it's too difficult to introduce, what a cop out & what a Liar!

It's about time us motorist's knew exactly how much tax the government collect from us not just from fuel duty but also road tax, it seems to me as most of the money they collect is wasted, I mean all this cheap pot hole filling, why don't they take the top off the road like they used to years ago & re surface the roads properly?

In my view there is not alot we can do about the fuel prices because supermarkets, & the oil companies are all in it together, the oil companies are making hay whilst the sun still shines, I bet in 20 years time there will be very little cars being produced that run on petrol Diesel or gas so they are going to take the pi$$ whilst they can.

I can see big trouble for the economy though if things keep proceeding the way they are with fuel prices, it does matter & things can not continue, with the inflation getting out of control & wages goine down in real terms it's only a matter of time before the bubble burst's.

As for MP's and we need to think about all of them, when you look at your own councils who really run the services not the government well all these pi$$ in the same pot! Do you really think they give a flying f*ck about the middle class working man? hmmmmmmmmmmm I'm all right jack!

We could moan & moan but it won't get us anywhere as we have to have these morons running the country a dictating to us, I mean they just spent over £100,000 on a new years party pi$$ up at the commons at the tax payers expense! The Coalition are nothing but a bunch of losers & it seems to me they are wasting money like never before.

Mitchell January 7, 2011

report reply to Mitchell

Phil,

It sounds to me like you are a biologist (if you actually are a scientist) , because no chemist or physicist could possibly get as many things wrong as you.

Arthur January 6, 2011

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Earth to #89 Phil

So you admit that perpetual motion machines are impossible - that's a start. Presumably you also agree that Stanley Meyer was a fraudster?

You think the stuff from John Belini (have you even seen his barely literate website?) and Tom Bearden is any better? You believe someone with a fake Phd? You believe there is "another form of energy"? This is closer to religion than science! If this is such a great discovery (and it's hardly new) where are the practical applications? What problems have been solved? We now have new limitless energy? OK, he's flogging some dodgy battery chargers - that'll save the world!

Faraday's laws have nothing to do with the fact that the energy required to liberate Hydrogen from water is greater than the energy the Hydrogen can provide. And what difference does "the electrical tech we have today" mean?

"soon there is going to be riots anyway due to people lossing there homes and losing there jobs! so you ll find out anyway."

Why would that be when we have Stan, John, Tom and Phil to save us with this new energy? Milk and honey all round surely?

OK, so you use veg oil in your Diesel engine. So what? Thousands of people have been doing so for years - it's nothing new. I'm also aware of the HMRC rules on it thanks. Using recycled oil (veg or otherwise) to power engines is a million miles away from 'new energy'.

You receiving? Over.

Tim Donaldson January 6, 2011

report reply to Tim Donaldson

fuel vat should be charged the same as gas and electric they are purchased in the same way. everything depends on petrol/deisel from food lorries to ambulances surely it is an essencial not a luxuary

Phil January 6, 2011

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48

Arthur First off, perpertual motion machine = is impossible to make, try reading and investigating John Bedini's work before going off on one John bedini even states this "its not perpertual motion" just another form of energy, as a scientist you do not take the facts of the electrical principles that are 145 years out of date, and no Edison did not event AC, Telsa did! and Tesla died a poor man in a hotel due to his work and genius and the fact that he was to smart for his own good.


So you way to me "As a scientist you will be well aware that the energy required to liberate the Hydrogen from the water is greater that the energy the Hydrogen can provide?" that is based on Faraday's laws of electrolysis 1832 umm yup let me do my calc, 179 years old! Mr Farraday did not have semi conductors or any kind of electrical tech that we have today.

As for...
So you're a scientist? Excuse me if the juvenile gibe about Keith and I makes me think otherwise!

I m just winding you up because you are an Arm chair Commando who likes Keith! and its working. ;-p


Following your success with John Belini's experiments you must be laughing all the way to the bank. A perpertual motion machine at last!
See above notes! "its not perpertual motion" just another form of energy

Me, I'm going to buy a degree in Alchemy form the same place Tom Bearden bought his Phd! Gold at $1,300 an ounce anyone?
Maybe you can after all you are an Arm Chair Commando, maybe you could buy it with your pay pal account?

What is an armchair commando? Oh yeah, and my question about the French. Your answer?

My Answer, soon there is going to be riots anyway due to people lossing there homes and losing there jobs! so you ll find out anyway.

As for you answering my current answer about ATG SVO kits to run diesel cars off pure cooking oil, your reponse?... Allow me to do your,,, BUT WE ALL HAVE TO PAY DUTY AS WE ARE SLAVES TO THE GOVERNMENT...

my answer to this - No we do not pay fuel duty on the first 2500 Litre od cooking oil we use - This is FACT! and on HMRC website, so dont even try to tell me this is incorrect, or i will take your Arm Chair away from you when you go to the toilet and then you will have to be a real Commando!

Keith, have words with him tonight in bed will you!


ok

Caroline Constable January 6, 2011

report reply to Caroline Constable

Why is it that when petrol prices were rising so swiftly in 2000 (towards the £1 mark for unleaded) protests were almost instantaneous and yet today when unleaded petrol stands in some places at £1.30, is nothing being done?
No-one can sustain these continued price increases, so where are those who started the protests of 2000? Come on out, we will be behind you again!

Arthur January 6, 2011

report reply to Arthur

#86 Kenneth. B

"One thing that never changes is that there is always change".

It's a fairly common expression. Everything changes - and that fact is the only thing that doesn't. The other common one (flipside) is that 'People don't like change'. All I'm really say is that we have had a number of years of 'good times' built on credit and it can't continue - hence many of the changes (higher taxes etc) that people are complaining about.

I think people sometimes need to look back over the last 50 years or so and see that what we and parents thought of as 'normal' would be perceived as unbelieable hardship now - look at the 'change' there!

Kenneth. B January 5, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

83 Arthur,

"One thing that never changes is that there is always change".
You've just mystified at least half of the people on here.
There are certainly more questions than answers, and the imposition of a 20% VAT rate, has obviously rattled a few cages, and some posters on here appear to think that you me and a few other like minded people actually condone the rise. They couldn't be more wrong. Now, I may be able to do household accounts, but I'm not well versed enough to do the country's accounts, so that's why we employed George Osborne (I didn't say elected him, as many of us didn't vote for him) to do those accounts for us. I can't in all honesty say that raising VAT was the right move, I simply don't know, but I'm broad minded and long sighted enough to know that, if he can't come in the front door, then you can bet every penny that that 2.5% rise will bring in, that he'd come in the back door, so if anything, he's been quite up front about it, rightly or wrongly. The country is in dire straits, and anyone who refuses to believe this are only deluding themselves.
Given the current increasing price of oil, perhaps the very best we could hope for is a postponement or cancellation of the fuel duty rise scheduled for April, and the "fuel duty stabilizer" we were promised, now seems to have been conveniently forgotten about, but will the British people forget about it come the next General Election? Surprisingly, they probably will.
I'm not sonofpeak's biggest fan (far from it) but a lot of what he says has credence, I just wish he'd have a day off.

Peak A Boo January 5, 2011

report reply to Peak A Boo



What is Peak Oil?

A picture is worth a thousand words ....

See: vimeo dot com/15477088

Keith January 5, 2011

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Post 83.

This is heresy Arthur!!! Are you suggesting that 52" plasma tv's, i pods and i phones etc are not a basic human right? Please tell tell me it's not true, who can get by without all that and then have to think about living within our planetary means too!

You are having a larf, c'mon, admit it, this is the first world, we got rights without responsibility :)

Arthur January 5, 2011

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#82 Kenneth. B

Pretty much so - although I don't know all the answers any more than anyone else (or even the questions!). I do however like to think that I try and look at it from more than just the point of how fuel prices drain my wallet.

One thing that never changes is that there is always change - and we are in a period when we need to consider the future for energy and transport. As I've said before, just because the short term consequences are hard (and clearly harder on some than others) doesn't mean that the changes are 'wrong'. We all need to become more efficient and, dare I say it, self reliant - in a considerate way. The frustrating thing about the rants on here is, not only are they unrealistic in their expectations (somebody else will do the work, price per litre can come down by 25% with no consequences) they also give the impression that it's IMPOSSIBLE to do anything for oneself to make the situation even slightly better.

Kenneth. B January 5, 2011

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#78 Arthur.
You & I don't need separate hymn sheets, we appear to be singing from the same one. Yes?
One thing surprises me: Why hasn't sonofpeak, or peak himself asked for proof of rip off in post 75. He must be slacking.

Barry January 5, 2011

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Those of you wishing for a fuel protest are quite mad in my opinion. Say we do get a fuel blockade, how long will it be before you are complaining that there is no milk/bread/eggs in the shops. Cant get to work because you queued for petrol for 5 hours and when you got to the pump there was none left.

Its all very well wanting a protest but think about the consequences, are you happy to live on pasta and rice for a couple weeks (if you have enough of that in stock) for a 2p (if your lucky) drop in the rate of duty. Which no doubt will go back up after a few weeks because of oil price rises.

In my opinion, no Government in their right mind is going to drop fuel duty when oil prices are rising. Would you really appreciate it if the Government dropped duty by 2p and oil prices meant 2p went back on. Would you then be prepared to have 2p added to income tax. Your still no better off and the Government must raise taxes elsewhere to make up the difference. I think we all (myself included) need to get used to driving less..

Johnny Testerson January 5, 2011

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I am <b>Outraged</b> I didn't get on this offer!
<a onmouseover="alert('boo!')" href="#">Oh well.

Nicky January 5, 2011

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Febuary 1st should be run over an MP day, It would be worth wasting th fuel

Arthur January 5, 2011

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#76 Roslyn

Thanks - don't get up from your armchair - you're a great example the Great British Entitlement and Dependency Society.

So you're ENTITLED to cheaper fuel and you're going to DEPEND on someone else to get it for you. What a joke!

Hey Roslyn, try taking responsibility for yourself. It might involve some work and hardship - something you and your fellow strike/protest advocates seem to see as a last resort - but at least you can say YOU did it!

Arthur January 5, 2011

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#75 Jez

Even at £1.30 a litre and assuming you work a 5 day week, for your £60 you're only getting around 25mpg. You've either got a very large engined vehicle (in which case why are you complaining about the price of fuel?) or you drive in a very inefficient manner - something you can change.

Along with the others saying "Time for another fuel protest methinks...." you don't say what you want taxing instead to make up the shortfall of lost Duty.

Whilst Sonofpeak, and his 'father' Peakoil may have fairly dismal communication skills, don't let that cloud the fact that there are some valid points in the post - just ignore the alarmist pomposity and remember that 'they' don't have a crystal ball any better than anyone else's.

Roslyn Elliott January 5, 2011

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Come on You lorry drivers time for a fuel strike!!

Stop the goods moving lets see how we manage then. If other countries aren't happy with what the government do they strike, the block the ports.

We are meant to be a nation that is proud of our country, I am not proud of our country or the silly little men running it... We need action as these people will just sit in there little offices funded by us saying we will just keep on increasing things the british public seem to moan a little but never do anything.

This country has gone to the dogs. We Need Action To Prove. We Want The England Back We Were Once Proud Of.

If the lorries do get a fuel strike underway don't give them a hard time support them because it will effect us all in the long run.

Jez January 5, 2011

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Sonofpeak, is obviosly here for one thing only to wind people up,

Firstly no petrol is NOT too cheap, the government in this country is taking the pi** with the cost of fuel and duty and road (ripoff) errm i mean road tax, in the UK we have the roads of a 3rd world developing country not the alledged one of the most powerfull countries in the world.

I work 25 miles from my home, (I live in a rural area) and it cost's or did untill this week, almost £60 to fill up a week just and i mean JUST to go to and from work, without doing any other driving about,

I could i suppose go by train except that the train fairs went recently also, and it takes me 35-45 minutes by car compared with one and a half hours by train and bus to get to work in the morning, and almost twice that to get home in the evening, this is unacceptable in my view, when i have a car i can use.....

We pay way too much to use the roads in this country, and don't get the services we are paying for, enough is enough....

Time for another fuel protest methinks....

Keith January 4, 2011

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Post 73.

Made me smile. But I'm puzzled, there are a large number of idiots posting here, which ones do you mean? Just curious.

Kenny January 4, 2011

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Who opened the lid on #70's coffin?
Consistent only in his delusion of being full of his own impotence. (No spelling mistake).
It's bad enough listening to some of the idiots on here now without his usual 12 step plan. Doesn't he ever give up?

Sonofpeak January 4, 2011

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Fuel is STILL far too cheap.

If you're all prepared to pay £2 - £3 for a cup of coffee in a Cost-a-Packet outlet then why complain if fuel goes up by a penny or two per litre?

After all, a litre of fuel can take you a lot further than a litre of coffee.


It's time to end our addiction to oil and here's how we can do it:

A Twelve-Step Plan to End Oil Addiction (courtesy of The Oil Drum)

1. Stop deluding ourselves. The era of cheap, readily-available oil has ended. Prices may fluctuate, but the underlying trend is up, up, up. We have to get used to using less.

2. Demand that politicians take the issue seriously. Make it an election issue. Don't take 'we've got everything under control' as an answer.

3. Stop building new roads. They're a monumental waste of money, time and effort. They encourage, rather than ease congestion and besides, the growth in car travel that's used to justify them isn't going to happen anyway.

4. Divert that money and effort into measures that address the challenges of oil depletion and climate change.

5. Make a major investment in public transport. It needs to be better, faster, more comfortable, more regular and more predictable. It needs to cater for everyone, not just peak-hour commuters though they need a better service as well.

6. Make a major investment in broadband internet to allow more people to work from home and change tax and business practices that discourage working from home. The more car trips we can avoid, the better.

7. Electrify transport where possible. We should be electrifying commuter rail where it is not already electric and using light rail (trams) in the cities. On the other end of the scale, electric bikes and scooters can make a big difference in our cities. And electric cars show promise, though there's a lot of questions to be answered yet.

8. Don't use cars unless there's no alternative. Take the bus. Take the train. Switch to a scooter. Walk or cycle - both your wallet and your doctor will thank you.

9. Deal with other aspects of our oil dependence. Agriculture, for example, is highly dependent on oil. We're going to need to change the way we grow and distribute food. Let's get to work on that now, not wait until supermarket shelves start to empty.

10. Stockpile or manufacture vital products currently imported from overseas. When oil runs short, will that still be possible? Let's take stock now and work out what we may need to start stockpiling or making (again) in the UK.

11. Think local. Ending our oil addiction isn't just up to central government, though it can play its part. Communities can work together to make themselves more resilient. Join or start a Transition Towns group in your local area.

12. Accept reality. The age of cheap oil is over. It's not coming back. As individuals and as a nation, we have to adapt.

From this moment on, oil prices will continue to rise.

For the terminally bewildered amongst you I repeat:

The time is now to start thinking about and making changes to the way you live so your life is not so oil-centered. Remember that a lack of oil extends far beyond just not being able to drive your car - so many other products, services and industries are based on oil.

Start preparing for a life of austerity. NOW!

Find local employment. Reduce your debts. Reduce your fuel consumption. Grow your own vegetables or buy from local suppliers. Exercise regularly. Insulate your home. Help your family, friends and colleagues to understand the implications of Peak Oil.

Got it? :)

Craig January 4, 2011

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This duty increase combined with VAT increase and planned increases in April won't do the economy much good and we'll all feel the brunt of it, with all goods rising either by VAT, or VAT exempt goods rising due to extra transportation costs.

I'm one of the lucky few in that I'm won't really be affected by the rise in fuel as my car is my toy/hobby & only use about a tank of fuel a month. And by the time we get half decent weather I can cycle to work instead & have a chance to work on it a bit more - although it is a bit of a pain that the things I want to buy for it will go up thanks to the VAT increase.

However, on the other hand, the other car in our house hold is an RX8 which isn't exactly economical! Then again it only does 200 miles a month so again, shouldn't be too bad on us.

IPT going up by 1% on Jan 1st was the one I was dreading! Insurance is already bad enough for us young motorists!

Peter Orr January 4, 2011

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Its funny how people start with the whinge and whine, but nevertheless it all boils down to one thing.. fuel prices have gone up, not just the petrol and the diesel but gas and electricity, so where are the people shouting about this.. nowhere!!! I drive because i cannot use public transport but that doesn't stop me from being a voluntary worker and I have been doing it for almost 20 years.. But it takes me into more rural area's where public transport if it does exist, it only appears maybe once a day if not less, so how do i get to my work, do i ride a bike, put a jet propulsion unit on my wheelchair (that i would like to see!!!)!!

No I have to drive, I have to pay for my fuel but if it comes to a Fuel Protest again, I Will be back on the blockade just as last time. But isn't it about time something was done... this 20% VAT tax hike was the wrong tax at the wrong time.. retailers are already saying that if people stop coming in the door then their business and staff will suffer - its their profits that will suffer, they all have a margin that in most cases could swallow up the 20% tax hike, but you can honestly say that most won't and will add the 20% to the already high prices.. And to those who say change your car, well i am about to from petrol to diesel to try and save money and if anyone else who is a volunteer doing the same work in the same area as myself, then yes vehicle share is no problem..

BUT think just one second.. remember that all the emergency services and those that volunteer to help them ie St. John's, etc who have to pay for their own fuels as they don't get mileage costs and can you hear them complaining.. I can't but if the UK Public doesn't get its act together and make their concerns felt by either remembering that there maybe another election in 2011 because people won't take to being ripped off...

Jobs are going, more people are becoming unemployed, the private sector is supposed to be making more jobs available to offset the public sector, but 20% VAT is going to do a lot of damage ... the outcome well in a couple of years, there will be more cars parked on drives or in garages, there will be fewer traffic jams.. and as for me well i might just buy a horse and trap all i need is a field and stable...

Sue Harris January 4, 2011

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Our local Tory MP who seems to spend most of his time on facebook was asking the other day what others thought would be the best/cheapest option for geting to work(Westminster!) I thought we the tax payer paid his traveling expenses anyway.
I feel sorry for our neighbours she is disabled(not enough to get mobility thou) her husband is her carer. We live in a village that no longer has a Shop or Bus service so a car is essential. It's 2 miles to the nearest shop, Doctors surgery,Bus/Train service, how are people like this suppose to cope with these rises?

Arthur January 4, 2011

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#63 @ Martin
Ok, last attempt at putting a reasonable view across to you.

Firstly, #64: yes there are other people stamping their feet. That doesn't mean they're right though. Sure, most people would put their hands up for things being cheaper - that doesn't mean they CAN be cheaper - and that's before you even get into defining 'cheap' (#65 makes a good read).

#63, so planning journeys, car sharing, driving slower - these aren't practical suggestions? Why not? Move to Canada? - your suggestion! Change car or move? As I said, these are harder to do!

The fact that you didn't vote for the Conservatives doesn't make the Government invalid - it's called Democracy I'm afraid.

"i dont think charging £1 a litre will mean we lose all schools and hospitals" No, not ALL will close, that would be stupid. SOME would and you could expect the service you receive to go downhill significantly if you don't replace the lost revenue.

"is it my fault that they did NOT keep their word and lied just to gain power?" What, they promised to reduce fuel prices to below £1 a litre? I must have missed that.

Martin, rather than just ranting try joining up the dots. How are you going to find any answers if you won't even acknowledge the problems?

Barry January 4, 2011

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I have to agree with Arthur here. Being able to drive a car is not a right its a privilege. One that we in this country have enjoyed for quite a long time.

However other countries now also want to be able to drive cars and they are willing to pay for it. If we want to continue to drive we will have to compete with them for the oil. Its simple capitalism. Its just that we are now seeing the down side for the first time and its not pretty.

If you want to pay £1 litre for your fuel, how will you pay the extra tax Martin? Would you prefer a 30% rise in your council tax or income tax, because somehow and someone is going to have to pay the tax. The government dont care where it comes from although it seems to me to be the fairest tax. You have the choice, dont want to pay it dont drive, it really is that simple.

If you think you can do what a litre of petrol can do for less that £1.30 then go ahead. Petrol would be cheap at £10 litre for the amount of energy and portability of that energy it provides. Just think a litre of petrol can take an av sized car about 10miles. How much would it cost you to hire people to pull your car 10miles, it would be a lot more than £1.30. Think about the real value of fuel and it doesnt sound so expensive.

Martin January 4, 2011

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Arthur: oh and in case you really are a muppet why dont you go back and read the other comments in here and you will see that its not just me stamping my feet....?

Martin January 4, 2011

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Arthur, as i said before you make no contribution here you just critisize everyone, move to canada? change car? move from rural area? all pratical suggestions eh? and i dont think charging £1 a litre will mean we lose all schools and hospitals, bit dramatic no? i did vote during election and not for tories either but is that then my fault they got in by doing a deal? or is it my fault that they did NOT keep their word and lied just to gain power? If you dont have anything helpful just P*** off........

Arthur January 4, 2011

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#61 Martin

"so you think we should all just pay and not complain, that will help us all?" Where did I say that then?

"what a contribution you make to this" I pay my taxes.

"And cuting down IS useless, some of us dont have that luxury and as public transport is over-priced and usually late and almost unavailible in rural areas how do we cut down?" All the ways that have been suggested, e.g. driving slower, combining journeys, car sharing (all easy), getting a more efficient vehicle (may require a cash outlay - harder) or ultimately, if you can't afford to live in a rural area, move (harder still).

"and how is paying for a car, then paying tax on car, then paying road tax for car, then paying for mot, then insurance, then pay for fuel, then tax on fuel, then tax on fuel tax? and the after all that, laeve the car at home and pay for a train, bus or bike? you muppets.........what a way to save money eh?" All you're telling me is you can't afford a car. Funnily enough, nor can many people. Funnily enough, owning a car isn't a God goven right. What next - it has to be a Ferrari or nothing?

"we need to let the government know that WE make the desisions not them, WE have the power to decide the future of the uk?" Short memory Martin? There was an General Election last year (and local elections). That's how a Democracy works. Don't you understand that a Govenment does just that - governs? Just because Martin doesn't like something and stamps his feet doesn't mean that the Government is wrong. Would you prefer free-for-all anarchy?

"no wonder lots are emigrating to other countries, my friend moved to Canada, gets paid twice as much pays half income tax and fraction for fuel and car purchase" If it's so great and so easy, why haven't you joined him?

"and now it's time to show them who is boss.........the public." Thank God "the public" isn't the "boss" in the mob-rule way you have in mind, however, how are you planning to go about this? Then explain how much you are cutting Duty by to get to your <£1 litre figure and detail what further public expenditure cuts you are going to implement because there is less to spend. Would you really be happy with no schools or hospitals available to you?

Martin January 4, 2011

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#53 Arthur, so you think we should all just pay and not complain, that will help us all? what a contribution you make to this, why not you pay more tax so the rest of us dont have to? no, oh well.

And cuting down IS useless, some of us dont have that luxury and as public transport is over-priced and usually late and almost unavailible in rural areas how do we cut down?

and how is paying for a car, then paying tax on car, then paying road tax for car, then paying for mot, then insurance, then pay for fuel, then tax on fuel, then tax on fuel tax? and the after all that, laeve the car at home and pay for a train, bus or bike? you muppets.........what a way to save money eh?

we need to let the government know that WE make the desisions not them, WE have the power to decide the future of the uk? no wonder lots are emigrating to other countries, my friend moved to Canada, gets paid twice as much pays half income tax and fraction for fuel and car purchase, this is rip-off Britain because we let them do it and now it's time to show them who is boss.........the public.

Arthur January 4, 2011

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#56 Mitchell

I think you'll find that Peak Oil has pretty much moved from being a "theory" to an accepted fact these days. Oil is finite so cue endless debates about when the peak will be (or was). One thing for sure is that there is no-way 190 years left at current usage - and energy demands are increasing.

If you can bear the zealous, overpowering pomposity of the (largely) disaffected bloggers and ignore the religious overtones you will find some science (or sources of science) amongst the 'beliefs' over on the Powerswitch website. The bloggers there do themselves or their 'cause' no service at all - sidetracked left right and centre with all sorts of nonsense about society, business, markets, politics and so on. A simple message might be: conserve energy, investigate and implement alternatives, avoid waste and look after the environment!

Mitchell January 4, 2011

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Shale oil extraction will become much easier with better extraction methods and while oil heads up towards $100 a barrell i imagine its worthwhile to invest a fair amount into this. Peak oil is an outdated theory that failed to take into account movements in technology and potential new discoveries. Another fossill option is natural gas , if we could find a safe way to combust it in a vehicle engine then there is around 1 trillion + barrells equivalent just beneath the US rockys , However for the time being it would be like driving a bomb around.

Scott Melvin January 4, 2011

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Fuel in ZE1/2/3 Shetland Isles is now 143.9/L DIESEL and 140.9/L PETROL

You folk south think you have it bad, when you blockaded the depots in 2008 the price you were paying was already the norm up here back then.


NB: We have Europes largest oil terminal here. It's a slap in the face that we have to pay the most for fuel in europe, when most of it comes ashore here.

Keith January 4, 2011

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Post 56

I think you will find the IEA disagrees with you there Mitchell, and they are a conservative bunch.

Shale oil extraction is utterly ruinous to the environment too, an area the size of Wales has already been completely trashed in Canada (Mind you, that wouldn't worry anyone if it actually was Wales).

Mitchell January 4, 2011

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#54

"Longer term, what are you going to do when the oil runs out?"

- If this refers to "peak oil" i dont think this theory really carries any real weight these days. On a current usage curb graph and including things like shale oil reserves we have an estimated 190 years left. As the extraction techniques increase in efficiency also this is a figure that is hugely conservative.

Arthur January 4, 2011

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#54 Chris

Fair points, but I think you are ignoring the fundamentals:

"Cutting down on usage is also pointless". Why? Short term you are saving yourself money (isn't the expense one of the issues?). Longer term, what are you going to do when the oil runs out?

"The real shameful thing about fuel prices is that VAT is charged on the duty" Why is it shameful? Same applies with booze and cigs. Use of road fuels has a negative effect on the environment and health too.

"What will make people most angry about these rises is the paltry proportion of motoring taxes spent on road maintenance" Agreed, our roads are generally cr*p. However, the current fundamentals are about cutting spending and raising tax - not looking for more things to spend money on. Would you choose to spend more on roads and less on health and education?

Just because the medicine is horrible it doesn't mean we shouldn't be taking it!

Chris Johnston January 4, 2011

report reply to Chris Johnston

Fuel protests wont work - best case scenario you get a very short term respite but at a high cost of inconvenience to most people and the reality for most people is that sustained periods of inconvenience cannot be maintained (just look at the snow chaos at airports).

Cutting down on usage is also pointless - if chancellor takes £1billion less in fuel duty due to lower use, the tax would just get increased again to compensate because fundamentally politicians are lying cheats who have no clue about how real people live and have completely forgotten that the money they spend is taxpayers money.

The real shameful thing about fuel prices is that VAT is charged on the duty - it is the most blatant taxing of a tax - fuel retailers could help by changing their receipts to show the fuel cost, VAT on fuel cost and duty separately and also the percentage of the fuel cost that is VAT - people might be keener to question their MPs more when they see VAT rate on fuel is effectively 40%.

What will make people most angry about these rises is the paltry proportion of motoring taxes spent on road maintenance - Don't know how bad rest of country is but in central Scotland the roads are like third world tracks with many of the pot holes being there for well in excess of a year and the government and councils at best patching with a shovel of tar and a whack with a shovel which last 5 minutes. Motorists need to see a better return for their tax take.

Arthur January 4, 2011

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#51 Kenneth B

Why bother posting anything sensible on this blog when as soon as you do another #52 Martin comes along?

Regarding commercial transportation, the VAT increase has no impact on haulier and bus operator costs. I imagine a Duty reduction for hauliers would have a negligible impact on shop prices (and we, as individuals, would still have to pick up the Government shortfall somehow). A Duty reduction for bus operators could potentially lower ticket prices quite a bit - but then you get into debates about buses being favoured versus trains, taxis etc (although commercial AvGas has a significantly lower Duty rate!). Do (some?) bus companies receive subsidies?

The VAT charged on top of Duty may feel like a kick - but they are distinctly different - same applies to booze. Business can claim back the VAT, but everyone pays the Duty!

Martin January 4, 2011

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Yes time for another protest to get fuel back down below £1 a litre, that should be the minimum, it is funny tho now that the torries are in power they and the lib dems are going back on everything they said they would not do.....just shows you no party is to be believed and the whole electoral system is out dated and needs to be scrapped, please people wake up and smell the s**t these polititians are spewing and remind them they work for US not THEMSELVES, the expenses scam sure died a death with only a couple facing charges the rest pretty much got away with it, if i robbed a bank i would expect more than ( if i pay it back it will be ok).........SPEAK NOW before its too late....

Kenneth. B January 4, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

O.K, time for a reality check here.
I'm as miffed as everyone else at how much our fuel has gone up in recent days/weeks, and when we see how much other countries are paying for their fuel ($2.70 gallon in the U.S, their gallon is smaller) we rightly feel aggrieved, but considering that most modern cars will return 40,50,60 and
some 70 mpg,(average 50 mpg) we should realise that 5p extra per liter to drive 200 miles has only cost us £1.00 more. I know that shortly it's due to increase even further, so even more reason to be miffed, but how many of the people complaining on this blog think nothing of playing an extra line or two on the lottery when there's a "roll over", or buying 2 or 3 scratch cards when they're feeling lucky (punk) (The lottery is a game created for people who can't do maths).
The Hauliers & Bus companies are getting a rough deal, some are or will go to the wall with the latest round of duty increases, but the agriculture industry gets reduced duty fuel (red diesel) so why can't the haulage and bus companies get a similar concession, and let them run on red diesel. The majority of bus/lorry drivers are 100% honest (they won't want to risk their jobs) but there are a select few that will pilfer diesel from their vehicles, so allowing operators to use red or any colored diesel would go some way to stopping that practice (there'll always be the die hards) in return though we'd expect to see reduced prices in our shops (cue greedy retailer comments) less transportation costs should see reduced charges to businesses and retailers, which would hopefully be passed on (are we in the real World?).
To close: I see and share the view of many who see a "tax on tax" (VAT & Fuel duty) as morally wrong, and I too wonder if it boarders on the illegal, but surely some smart ar$ed lawyer would have taken up the case by now if it were.

Barry1 January 4, 2011

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49 Andrew
"We have control in this country we need to protest" Who is we? If you are including me, then I'd agree we have control - an imperfect democracy, but I don't need to protest. Is your definition of "we" just those with the same fruitloops ideas?

"we can control the government by everyone using their cars less or not at all. If we spent a day or two not using our cars, then using public transport as they say, this will put a strain on the public transport as there wouldnt be enough room on buses, trains etc. this would then make people late for work or not turn in, thus resulting in a detrimental effect on the economy." Why not just use public transport anyway? If there isn't enough room on the trains and buses and you normally go by car then presumably you will just be viewed as someone who is late or hasn't turned up - with the usual employment consequences? Are you prepared to put yourself on the dole? How would this be detrimental to the economy and why do you want to harm the economy anyway? Why do you want to make things worse?

"Lets play the government at their own game." What game is that? Getting buses and not turning up for work?

If you've even got a job I'd be amazed! If you do have a job, expect to be replaced by a machine some time this year!

Andrew Curren January 4, 2011

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We have control in this country we need to protest, we can control the government by everyone using their cars less or not at all. If we spent a day or two not using our cars, then using public transport as they say, this will put a strain on the public transport as there wouldnt be enough room on buses, trains etc. this would then make people late for work or not turn in, thus resulting in a detrimental effect on the economy. Lets play the government at their own game.

Arthur January 4, 2011

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#43 Phil

So you're a scientist? Excuse me if the juvenile gibe about Keith and I makes me think otherwise!

As a scientist you will be well aware that the energy required to liberate the Hydrogen from the water is greater that the energy the Hydrogen can provide?

Following your success with John Belini's experiments you must be laughing all the way to the bank. A perpertual motion machine at last!

Me, I'm going to buy a degree in Alchemy form the same place Tom Bearden bought his Phd! Gold at $1,300 an ounce anyone?

What is an armchair commando? Oh yeah, and my question about the French. Your answer?

Barry1 January 4, 2011

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35 Kitty Cat

You want a demo? - waste your own time thanks. Protesting is like tilting at windmills - a futile attack on fundamentals that can't be changed. Do you people really think that the 'Government' and 'Oil Companies' are "Greedy" and just putting up fuel prices out of spite? If you really are that dim I suggest you deserve whatever fate befalls you!

36 & 38 Peter

You just don't get it do you? Putting your head in the sand doesn't change the facts.

37 Julia

Great, you've got the answer! Only trouble is, those two trucks will have been towed away and impounded within a couple of hours and, if the petrol station owners have any backbone, the truck drivers will be looking for new kneecaps! I think you'll find that people can get quite angry when their legitimate businesses are being disrupted.

I've called myself Barry1 to differentiate myself from 46 Barry - which isn't me, although his post, along with the two before, are amongst the few sensible ones here!

Barry January 4, 2011

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I think we ve simply hit the limits to growth. When economies are expanding commodity prices are rising until it chokes the growth off. We need to be able to accept this and realise that we live on a finite planet where exponential growth is impossible.

3% growth per year is about 1700% per century, clearly we cannot use 17 times as much natural resources every 100 years because they simply wont be there. Having said that i dont think we will run out of oil in the next 20 years, it will just not be possible to afford to extract it at a price the economy can grow at.

Graham W January 4, 2011

report reply to Graham W

The oil price is rising because economies are recovering after the 2008 collapse and demand is rising. Opec is not increasing supplies so prices will rise until they either increase supply or demand falls. If supply and demand get out of balance then prices rise until they rebalance.

Those complaining about the tax rate on fuel, how did you expect to pay for the banking crisis or did you think that was for free... No somebody has to pay for it and as the nice man from the lottery used to say "Its you".

I cannot really see the problem with a tax on fuel, the more you use the more tax you pay. Use less fuel pay less tax it really is that simple. Of course the cost of living is going to rise, as hauliers must pass on their added costs but the more prudent have been expecting and preparing for that the last two years.

I think the things are going to get far worse before they get any better, and as someone said further up we will be delighted to only pay 1.30 a litre in six months time.

Kenneth. B January 3, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

Post 36 Peter:
No, neither a Conservative M.P nor Conservative voter, just someone that sees the entries to this blog regarding protests & boycotts are mostly coming from people who want other people to fight their battles for them.
"Lets start the ball rolling on that Petrol-prices blog, and hope someone else takes up the baton".
Fancy a protest Saturday afternoon Peter? Whats that? you can't, the football's on. What about Monday evening? Oh no Coronation Street & Eastenders.

I'm as fed up as the next person about the ever increasing cost of our fuel, but trying to incite unrest whilst finding any excuse not to take part yourself, hoping others will do it on your behalf only displays hypocrisy.
I'm not calling for protests (they're illegal anyway) and as for boycotts?
Please enlighten me by naming 2 places here in U.K that they've ever worked.

So you see, I'm not a buffoon or prize prat, just someone who can read between the lines.

If you don't play the game, don't make the rules.

Phil January 3, 2011

report reply to Phil

28

That's the one Keith.

So what is it we should do Phil, riot in the streets (again, examples of what the French have rioted about and what they achieved might encourage a few more people to start winkling out the cobble stones) or do we just stick the garden hose in our fuel tanks?

Do you really think there are such easy answers to life's problems Phil?

Posted by Arthur

Hey Arthur tell Keith to turn the lights off when he gets into bed with you,

Its not water in the tank its the Hydrogen from the water you very intelligent person, Hydrogen 2.6 times more power than Petrol, but hey you and keith knew that right, as for putting it in the tank, I m a diesel man, i put veg oil in it (SVO - Not Bio Diesel) using a ATG Conversion kit.

I Do you really think there are such easy answers to life's problems Phil?

Yes i do, instead of being an Arm chair commando, why dont you do some of John Bedini's expriements with simple the SSG/Monopole and explain to me where the power comes from? I ve done it, when you have done it bring you points of view back to the table, as for the rest of you, for now, buy a diesel and throw SVO in it with a ATG kit from Germany, and please no "it wont work on new diesels due to tolorances" BS! it will had has been done google diesel veg uk, that the easy solution for now.


Peter James January 3, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Post 39....as I've said before...these issues are not about car drivers who nip to the shops...it's about the commercial and business users who ....oh what's the point...some bloggers just don't get it...get a fleet of c1s mr stobart...WTF???? V

Keith January 3, 2011

report reply to Keith


post 35

Thanks for the invite, but no thanks. If I want to bang my head against a brick wall I'll do it at home :)

Peter James January 3, 2011

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Someone wrote prior that if we snub esso bp texaco etc and fill up at supermarkets it'll make em sit up and listen, the supermarkets just as bad so all they will do is rack up prices there, our survey said 'eh urgggh'...

Ben January 3, 2011

report reply to Ben

Post 25 - a refreshing post indeed!

Most people can reduce fuel consumption and save plenty.

(i) Drive a smaller/more efficient car. The diesel C1 does about 68mpg combined. A diesel Smart car about 85mpg. Check out any of the green car websites and make some comparisons - the most efficient in each class is considerably more efficient than the worst!
(ii) Cycle and walk more, especially local trips of two-three miles or less.
(iii) Drive slower. Compare your fuel consumption at 60mph with 70mph on the motorway. A dramatic difference!
(iv) Strip out your car. The lighter it is the less fuel it will consume.
(v) Check out the car-sharing websites and halve your fuel costs. Pre-booked trains and coaches are usually cheaper than cars for longer journeys.

Higher fuel prices are here to stay as oil prices increase over time due to peak oil. Oil will likely head over $100 per barrel again this year. We could see a run up to $120 by summer due to supply constraints. Be prepared for this!

Peter James January 3, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Post 35 ...kitty kat
I'm behind you and our illustrious leader "Barry".... Lol...may cost me a lot to drive down to Ten downing st in my hummer though!...Barry, don't even bother retorting to that...

Julia Bostle January 3, 2011

report reply to Julia Bostle

The only way for the goverment to take notice i think.
because the lorries in london didn't work last time if anything you was paying more tax congestion charge, use of fuel again more tax this is clearly not getting through to the goverment.
So there is only one clear solution instead on driving into london 2 trucks per petrol garage block both entrances noone gets fuel goverment don't get paid.
As they say on compare the market SIMPLES

Peter James January 3, 2011

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Post 31... Petrol/diesel isn't expensive enough eh..you prize prat...those folk who don't use or depend on their car for work can make significant changes to help reduce their fuel expenditure (bet your one one of em) ....myself and countless others feel the rises and they hurt....Keep your drivel to yourself and do your homework...buffoon!!! By the way for all you other folk,stick to the optimum speed to conserve fuel the savings can be significant however these steps still won't save businesses from going bust thanks to fuel hikes...post 31 are you the conservative local mp for Lincolnshire?

Kitty Cat January 3, 2011

report reply to Kitty Cat

Post 33 Barry

So help us then Barry

This is after all a blog to share ideas etc....

How do we arrange a demonstration? Once word gets around about this i am sure it will snow ball...

So far it’s just you and me Barry...anyone else out there ready to join in the fun?

Nick Thomas January 3, 2011

report reply to Nick Thomas

It's going to cost me £80 to fill up my car. I've already paid income tax on that £80 and 90% of my driving is to and from work. WTF?

Funny thing is I haven't noticed people driving any slower on the motorways. Do they realise that by driving like morons they are using about 20% more fuel than they would otherwise? There are people who are already paying the equivalent of £1.60 per litre because they don't understand how an engine works.

However, at this rate it will be cheaper to fly around the UK than it will to drive. How is that going to help cut our CO2 emissions?

Barry January 3, 2011

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32 Susie

"i cannot understand that people are not doing anything about the increase in fuel"

And what are you doing? Oh yeah, drivelling on a blog - typical British.......

Masterclass in irony, thank you Susie!

Susie Parr January 3, 2011

report reply to Susie Parr

i cannot understand that people are not doing anything about the increase in fuel - there was such a uproar when it hit 90p per litre - have we all gone soft or have we resigned ourselves to it yet again..... typical British....

Kenneth. B January 3, 2011

report reply to Kenneth. B

Oh dear, here we go again!
The usual lot of armchair activists are calling for boycotts & protests. They all "talk" a good fight, they just want someone else to do it for them.
You people are p*$$ing in the wind.
There will be NO protests, there will be NO boycotts that work, there will be NO reduction in either VAT or Fuel Duty. Get used to it. By the end of this year we'll all be wishing we were only paying today's prices.
If any of you spent half an hour or more trying to get FROM a store "sale" on Boxing day to New Years day, you'll see that petrol/diesel still isn't dear enough.

Martin Powell January 3, 2011

report reply to Martin Powell

It's time to make a stand,
We should boycott the main suppliers ie BP, Shell,Total and the like, stick to supermarkets. It might make them sit up and take notice. My car is LPG just had a 6.4 pence price hike over night.

Anthony January 3, 2011

report reply to Anthony

It appears that fuel retailers have taken advantage of the Vat hike to increase their pump prices earlier than the 4th! I filled up at Sainsburys this morning and the unleaded pump price was 126.9p, whereas on the 30th Dec it was £122.9p. Has anyone noticed this happening at other retailers?

Arthur January 3, 2011

report reply to Arthur

#27

That's the one Keith.

So what is it we should do Phil, riot in the streets (again, examples of what the French have rioted about and what they achieved might encourage a few more people to start winkling out the cobble stones) or do we just stick the garden hose in our fuel tanks?

Do you really think there are such easy answers to life's problems Phil?

Keith January 3, 2011

report reply to Keith



Post 26

I would not entertain joining a 'cue', but would consider a queue.

Was it this Stanley Meyers?

'Stanley Meyers was convicted of fraud in 1996 after he was unable to demonstrate his claims to investors or the court after soliciting large sums of money for commercializing his technology.'

Phil January 3, 2011

report reply to Phil

Post 22

- You speak of revolution, which reminds me of a quotation, can't remember who by:

'Do not speak of revolution unless you are willing to contemplate eating rats'.

Do you think they will be tasty?

Posted by Keith, 3rd January 2011 1:00am

Keith, hurry up and get in the cue to pay the Fuel Vat and Duty, dont quote things you cant even remember from whom it came.

I will quote something to you from Red Dwarf (BBC).

"I believe everyone should bring something to a conversation, i believe you should bring silence"

Just google Stanely Meyers, or John Bedini/Tom bearden.

Arthur January 3, 2011

report reply to Arthur

#1, #8, #14, #22: Good to see not everyone addled their brains over Christmas!

To the rest - looks like wilful ignorance of the facts. Ranging from #4 - there were no "excuses" as Duty went up to cancel out the VAT reduction - so prices didn't drop, to #12 "Rip Off Britain" - a nice headline for Sun readers - who is ripping off who please? to #24 and the old chestnut "do like the French" - please give me half a dozen examples of French protests - what they were about and what they achieved.

You might find it easier to cope in these difficult times if you arm yourself with the facts rather than whinge and whine based on what some other dimwit in the pub has said or what you read in the tabloids!

The classic so far: #10 "If petrol was lower than people may afford to get out and visit the shop...and the government will still get extra in tax."! So let me get this right - if I save this £2 on a fill up (which will give me a good 600 miles) I can drive down to the shops to spend that £2 on some unnecessary tat and this will help save the economy? Why, if I'm so badly off, don't I just save the £2? Or do you mean that I will simply be able to afford to go to the shops and not spend anything? Or do you just not have a clue?

Ian Bailey January 3, 2011

report reply to Ian Bailey

its time to do like the french do block all the roads its just rip off britain again

James January 3, 2011

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Its your guys fault for voting for these muppets to be in charge.

Keith January 3, 2011

report reply to Keith



Post 21 - You speak of revolution, which reminds me of a quotation, can't remember who by:

'Do not speak of revolution unless you are willing to contemplate eating rats'.

Do you think they will be tasty?

Phil January 2, 2011

report reply to Phil

I think the students had the right ideal! Think its time for a revolution and riots in the streets, the french do it all the time and get results!
Ah but we are british, we will just all moan about it and all get in the cue to pay the VAT and Fuel Duty and do nothing about it.
Bet this gets deleted as it showing the facts.
Stanley Meyers had the answer to fuel problems, look what happened to him!

Peter James January 2, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Agree ...post 14 must be aged 14 and living on mars...how the f k is the haulier supposed to get to get your bread,milk and supplies to the supermarket in a smart car you moron...jeez...im supposed to run my car for work on 40p a mile then a pathetic 25p a mile ...oh and if my wheels don't turn I get paid zero from my company and I'll be 400 pounds a month worse off!!!! ........

Peter James January 2, 2011

report reply to Peter James

Politicians don't give a fck about car/lorry/van drivers..neither do the petrol providers,in my area they have been putting prices up a penny a week! No point in complaining as us drivers have no where else to go...apart from saving pennies by buying supermarket fuel which by the way doesn't go as far as branded fuel,that's a fact...a human being only lives once so they WILL rip you off at every opportunity...fact is oil/petrol bosses and piticions can sleep at night knowing all these taxes won't make a difference to them and they DONT CARE!!!!!







Richardb January 2, 2011

report reply to Richardb

Post #14 - That's a really good suggestion! Tell you what I will pass that idea on to one of my work collegues who commutes from Southampton to Sussex I'm sure he woul love the daily cycle!!

Richardb January 2, 2011

report reply to Richardb

Unfortunately we are all being taken for mugs! The price of oil is circa $90 a barrel and rising (mainly due to OPEC reducing the amount of oil being distributed to increase demand and value). In July 2008, oil was $150/barrel and the price of diesel was £1.34, so why is the price of diesel now £1.30/l against a barrel at $90!!?? Because leaders around the world see the motorist as an easy target to raise revenue, hiding behind the old "green issue" smoke screen putting a penny on here and there followed by the forecourt adding their own mark up. It won't drop as quick when oil prices drop! Problem is, this country just sits back and does nothing about it! At the current rate I can see the price of Diesel being anywhere between £1.50 - £1.80/l by the end of 2011! So what chance has this country got of climbing out of any economic downturn? Non at all! Salaries stay stagnant, or reduce, but the cost of living continues to rise in all sectors!

Happy 2011 folks, best buy a bike or "work from home"

Paul January 2, 2011

report reply to Paul

To the guy at post 14,some of us do drive small engine cars (1.1) and there is only so much 'cutting back' you can do where even owning a car this size makes little difference.
I am 31 and saving as much money as i can to leave this sad place that thinks taxing people to death is the way to go.As the other guy above commented you take money out of peoples pockets and that has a domino effect on everything else,the lunatics are running the asylum!.

Munkstar January 2, 2011

report reply to Munkstar

Get a smaller engined car and start cycling and walking as a balance.

J T January 1, 2011

report reply to J T

i am afraid it isnt just 'rip off britain' it seems to be the case in most of europe. in greece they are paying £1.48p/L for regular unleaded.
this in a coutry where the average wage is €1000/month.

what our govormnents fail to appreciate is simple macro economics. if we must pay more money to them in taxes and to the oil companies the money has to come from somewhere. people will spend less in other areas, clothing, leisure....whatever. companies already stuggling will fail. this is the recession that cameron and clark want.

this is no way to encourage the growth of an economy.

the real sting will come when the mortgage interest rate inevitably increases, which it will because the RPI by which they measure inflation refers to fuel prices. even though salaries are decreasing the bank of england will still perceive an increase in fuel and goods prices by tax increase as inflation.

happy 2011.

James White January 1, 2011

report reply to James White

Rip off Britain for you I'm affraid

Untill people stand up to the Government the this is all we are going to get

Enjoy!

W Innes January 1, 2011

report reply to W Innes

Two price rises in the space of 2 days what are the goverment thinking, are they wanting the country to come to a complete halt.

I live in the western isles and the current fuel price is 1.36 for unleaded and 1.38 for deisel, with this double rise its going to take our fuel price to 1.40 plus a litre.

This is shocking, lots of people need to use cars, but the goverment couldnt careless as long as they get all there bounses of thousands of pounds.

Shirley Brown January 1, 2011

report reply to Shirley Brown

We need another fuel protest.

This is getting beyond a joke. Petrol is not a luxury it’s a necessity, to get to work
To making a living so the government can continue to rob us again.

If petrol was lower than people may afford to get out and visit the shop…and the government will still get extra in tax.

It’s getting to the point where people will not be able to afford to get to work and public transport…don’t even go there

So

How do we get the ball rolling…

Craig Holmes January 1, 2011

report reply to Craig Holmes

We definatly need another protest, The Goverment seems to think its completely ok to screw the common driver over. In the response from No10 to the petition i signed regarding getting the "temporary" fuel duty increase removed from when vat went back to 17.5%, they said we must bear our fair share of the uk recovery, i think we are paying more then our fair share already,

AND did you know fuel duty is going to go up in april as well. that will be the 3rd tax hike this year.

we should do what the french do when they dont like something, make the goverment hurt...

Tom Marshall January 1, 2011

report reply to Tom Marshall

G - when the VAT dropped, the government bumped up petrol duty to effectively wipe out the VAT saving - but then when the VAT went back to 17.5% they didn't reverse the fuel duty rise.

So, who'se taking bets on when unleaded crosses £1.50/litre - I'd be guessing it'll be there before Easter.

I wish I could cut back on my driving, but most of my driving is essential (work commuting) - although I certainly consider the cost of the travelling for anything I do these days

Robin Wellings January 1, 2011

report reply to Robin Wellings

Im getting sick of being screwed left, right & centre. I drive a lorry for a living, my partner works nearly full time & we have a business of our own.
We're getting stung by taxes threefold. REALLY SICK OF THIS. WE NEED ANOTHER FUEL PROTEST.

G January 1, 2011

report reply to G

why is it that when vat went down to 15% it took 3 months for fuel prices to drop. the excuse given was "we buy the fuel stock in advance so any discounts will be passed along when new stock is purchased" shouldn't it be the same now?

G January 1, 2011

report reply to G

wht is that that when vat went down to 15% it took 3 months for fuel prices to drop. the excuse given was "we buy the fuel stock in advance so any discounts will be passed along when new stock is purchased" shouldn't it be the same now?

Ben Poole December 31, 2010

report reply to Ben Poole

this site is incorrect.
i drive for a living and the diesel price is 129.9 per litre!

its wrong. the price in sa18 1ttw is over 130 a litre. whats going on here then?

i bet this post gets deleted!

Peter Dodd December 31, 2010

report reply to Peter Dodd

I thought that the VAT increase came in on 4th Jan or are they robbing the motorist early?

Keith December 31, 2010

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1. Have you had to change your driving habits?

Yes. Less of it!

2. Are you expecting 2011 to be worse than 2010 for running your car?

Oh yes.

3. Do you think we should use the tax from fuel to help better prepare our roads for snow?

No. Better spent on reinstating the canal network, re-nationilising the rail network and extending it, and extending the bus network, particularly in rural areas.
I say this because although the car may currently be the personal transport of choice, as fuel prices rise inexorably then that may cease to be the case for many, many motorists, so rail and bus services should be made ready now and be able to cope with a gradually rising demand.
Road haulage operators would probably appreciate alternative lower priced optins too, canal for non urgent stuff and rail for urgent. Road miles travelled could be slashed. Road haulage operators could become agents for canal and rail, and still offer road transport, albeit as the most expensive option, but they would stay in business and fund the canal and rail networks much more effectively than any state run scheme.

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