Save £2.00 when you fill up your tank, today only!
News entry dated 31st Dec 2010

Garages across the UK are set to hike the price of filling up a tank of fuel, already at record highs, by a further £2.00 per tank tomorrow.

These New Year price rises as a result of the hike in VAT from 17.5% to 20% combined with a planned duty rise will see an extra 4p being added to prices per litre to motor fuel.

Petrol and Diesel drivers will both be affected by the moves.

Not only have we seen this massive one off hike in the tax on fuel but it has hit us all at a time when the price of oil has been on the rise too. Oil now seems to have settled above 90 USD per barrel compared to highs of 80 USD through most of 2010.

As a PetrolPrices.com member as long as you are using our daily emails or our iPhone App you should be used to saving £2 per fill up anyway but we wanted to give you a heads up so that you can save on this planned rise.

Please tell us how this is affecting you. Have you had to change your driving habits? Are you expecting 2011 to be worse than 2010 for running your car? Do you think we should use the tax from fuel to help better prepare our roads for snow?

Earl de Michel February 25, 2013

They claimed fuel has gone up by 6.24p per litre, but at the pumps it is showing around 8-10p increase - are the garages making the profit???

ian wright November 16, 2012

How to save £80 a week on fuel, stay at home.

Joseph October 10, 2012

I am amazed that my Honda Civic, automatic, can only give me about 26 mpg driving round the town. The area has many hills, however, the mileage is very poor. Anyone know how to increase the mileage?

dennis robbins September 26, 2012

To comply with emission standards I now drive a 5 year old peugeot 107, 61.4 mpg £20 road tax a year as it is a small engine with 3 cylinders. I have recently had a 10000 mile service and had it filled with Magnatec Oil to get what the Manufacturers claim to be best for my car and am about to start using Esso's Fuel Energy Unleaded 97 again to improve engine cleaning and Mpg. I have been advised not to use the additives I used to use as this overheats the catalytic convertor and could shorten the convertors life, I want to use the best I can get for my car, if anyone out there has any sensible suggestions I would like to hear them.

nicola byrne March 30, 2012

Petrol prices out of control, when will it end?

William Guy Bradshaw March 23, 2012

I now drive a Suzuki Jimny 1.3 and as its not a speed machine I find I drive more like a very mature Sunday driver type. Speeding off at every set of lights when you will have to slam all on when you reach the next set just uses fuel!

Joseph Earing February 29, 2012

The day's of motoring I believe are numbered,I have been forced know to sell my motorhome, which I enjoyed many weekends away, spending money at local shops and tourist attraction's,this will know stop.It will have a knock on effect.
There will come a point when petrol is so expensive it won't sell.Some say it could be £2.00 a litr next year or sooner.

Melville K Jones February 15, 2012

Have you seen the e-mail circulating at the moment? Someone has worked out a few comparisons. e.g.
Evian (Naive spelt backwards) Water sells at £1.49 per 9 oz bottle = 21.19 per gall - for water and the buyer doesn't know the source of it! and Printer ink - wait for it - £5,200.00 per gall. Loads of other examples of such rip off prices. So, is Petrol that overpriced? Yes, I agree really, it is.

Gerry Canham January 31, 2012

Get a small motorcycle my 200cc alp 75 miles to a gallon.????

    Joseph Earing February 29, 2012

    Yes but a bit cold,get a citreon ci or similer 999cc get around 61 to the gallon,and it's wormer.

      Russ Uridge March 3, 2012

      I have to say, I bought a new Ford fiesta econetic back in 2010 when prices were roughly 90p per litre. The sales guy at Ford was trying to twist my arm into buying a zetec for the same price citing that fuel prices won't ever go up, they were at there highest.
      Now in the £1.40's I'm glad I did. I get roughly 100miles per £10 (give or take ten miles).
      My other half drives a Saab, and she gets about 40 miles per £10...
      Tragically the saab spends most of it's time parked up.
      Econetic for me was affordable, (as opposed to the electric/petrol super expensive ones) and better still.... the road tax is absolutely £0. because the emissions come in at 98g co2 per km.

nigel November 29, 2011

cant afford to drive now ,train fairs unafordable ,bus fares unafordable ,what next

Mathew November 29, 2011

It's totally out of control , can't afford now

    Anthony Dryden December 23, 2012

    Hi Mathew
    I'm afraid you are VERY wrong, the cost of fuel is very much under control, but sadly for us it's the government + supermarkets that are in control.
    Tony

Phoenix August 31, 2011

Petrol prices are completely out of control now, they really need to be dropped.

Peter July 10, 2011

So it won't run out for the deluded or for 3 year olds then?

Kellerman July 6, 2011

Re: Michael:

>Peak oil isnt a theory based on observation , nor does it take into account >new supply/demand and technological/economical factors that develop.

So, basically, technology will make a finite resource infinite?

And I assure you, it IS based on observation. Kindly look at Texas, Indonesia, the North Sea and you’ll see a trend. Hint: it’s decline regardless of technological innovation or expense.

Read up on secondary and enhanced oil recovery techniques. When utilised, they enable an old field to get a spurt in output again (this is seen in many North Sea and Texan fields). However, horizontal drilling and water or CO2 injection only delay the inevitable. Sooner or later, the water or gas level hits the wellhead, and then you start getting more water with a hint of oil than actual oil.

>You analogy is ill fitting also, as beer is man made. Many of Hubberts >colleague's always said he drew the graph first and selected data that fit. >How many times has the peak been revised? CERA recently reported peak >oil in 2030? If any other scientific theory had been revised so many times, it >would be a laughing stock however "big oil" continue to invest money in >"educating" people about peak oil as it suits there cause, higher oil prices.

Spoke like a true acolyte of CERA, and one who as never looked at BP’s statistical data or even that of the normally Pollyanna-esque IEA and EIA. Tell me, can you give me a source for your accusations (you know, the ones that make Hubbert out to be a hack, one revered as one of the greatest geologists of the 20th century)? Just curious.

By the way, I’d not put much credence in CERA.

Link 1: goo.gl/gPNFn

Woops!

Link 2: goo.gl/gPNFn

Double woops!

But I guess even a broken clock is right twice a day. But by all means, keep peddaling the conspiracy theory that it’s all Big Oil (we’ll ignore the fact that it clashes with the very idea of oil companies given if they admit peak oil, as the likes of ExxonMobil’s Rex Tillerson are keen not to, then it means they’re out of a job). Yeah, sure. My product is running out, but please, keep buying it. No, don’t go and talk to the solar panel dealer and stop ogling the nuclear power lady.


>It doesnt take into account improving shale method extraction, the 3 trillion >cubic feet of natural gas under the yukon, Continous deep sea field >discoveries, Offshore production is increasing, and the industry may soon be >asked to reconsider its basic assumptions about oil. Over the past few >decades, a number of industry experts and geologists have conducted >research suggesting that the origin of hydrocarbons may be abiogenic, not >organic. Stated simply, the abiogenic oil theory posits that oil is not formed >from plants and animals compressed for millions of years in sediment rock.
>Instead, oil is a primordial substance created before the formation of Earth, >and found deep underground

>Read about abiogenic petroleum origin theory and the number of top >experts in the field of hydrocarbon research flocking to support the theory.

>Maybe Kellerman, if you understood the laws of physics you may be able to >comment on them however your unscientifically based leftish sarcasm gives >of the impression of a complete void between your ears.

Oil shale isn’t ramping up to 85 Mbpd any time soon (by the way, the correct term is oil sands given the consistency). Even Shell realise this. Do yourself a favour and look at global demand, then look at the last ten years of stellar growth in oil sands. Assuming we don’t pollute the planet to hell first, it still won’t be anything but a drop in the bucket. The US alone uses more per day than any oil sands project has ever managed. I’m sure that’s great for those rich Americans.

Natural gas? Really? And I imagine you’ll tell me when all 7 billion people are using it to heat their homes, power their gadgets as well as run their cars, that the 40 years worth that the US and Russia have will last us another century.

And abiogenic oil is snake oil for people who failed organic chemistry. Tell me how many oil wells magically started filling up again, and for each one, I’ll give you a grand.

Here is a good rebuttal:

===

The fact remains that the abiotic theory of petroleum genesis has zero credibility for economically interesting accumulations. 99.9999% of the world's liquid hydrocarbons are produced by maturation of organic matter derived from organisms. To deny this means you have to come up with good explanations for the following observations.
The almost universal association of petroleum with sedimentary rocks.
The close link between petroleum reservoirs and source rocks as shown by biomarkers (the source rocks contain the same organic markers as the petroleum, essentially chemically fingerprinting the two).
The consistent variation of biomarkers in petroleum in accordance with the history of life on earth (biomarkers indicative of land plants are found only in Devonian and younger rocks, that formed by marine plankton only in Neoproterozoic and younger rocks, the oldest oils containing only biomarkers of bacteria).
The close link between the biomarkers in source rock and depositional environment (source rocks containing biomarkers of land plants are found only in terrestrial and shallow marine sediments, those indicating marine conditions only in marine sediments, those from hypersaline lakes containing only bacterial biomarkers).
Progressive destruction of oil when heated to over 100 degrees (precluding formation and/or migration at high temperatures as implied by the abiogenic postulate).
The generation of petroleum from kerogen on heating in the laboratory (complete with biomarkers), as suggested by the biogenic theory.
The strong enrichment in C12 of petroleum indicative of biological fractionation (no inorganic process can cause anything like the fractionation of light carbon that is seen in petroleum).
The location of petroleum reservoirs down the hydraulic gradient from the source rocks in many cases (those which are not are in areas where there is clear evidence of post migration tectonism).

8 ) The almost complete absence of significant petroleum occurrences in igneous and metamorphic rocks (the rare exceptions discussed below).
The evidence usually cited in favour of abiogenic petroleum can all be better explained by the biogenic hypothesis e.g.:

Rare traces of cooked pyrobitumens in igneous rocks (better explained by reaction with organic rich country rocks, with which the pyrobitumens can usually be tied).
Rare traces of cooked pyrobitumens in metamorphic rocks (better explained by metamorphism of residual hydrocarbons in the protolith).
The very rare occurrence of small hydrocarbon accumulations in igneous or metamorphic rocks (in every case these are adjacent to organic rich sedimentary rocks to which the hydrocarbons can be tied via biomarkers).
The presence of undoubted mantle derived gases (such as He and some CO2) in some natural gas (there is no reason why gas accumulations must be all from one source, given that some petroleum fields are of mixed provenance it is inevitable that some mantle gas contamination of biogenic hydrocarbons will occur under some circumstances).
The presence of traces of hydrocarbons in deep wells in crystalline rock (these can be formed by a range of processes, including metamorphic synthesis by the fischer-tropsch reaction, or from residual organic matter as in 10).
Traces of hydrocarbon gases in magma volatiles (in most cases magmas ascend through sedimentary succession, any organic matter present will be thermally cracked and some will be incorporated into the volatile phase, some fischer-tropsch synthesis can also occur).

Traces of hydrocarbon gases at mid ocean ridges (such traces are not surprising given that the upper mantle has been contaminated with biogenic organic matter through several billion years of subduction, the answer to 14 may be applicable also).

The geological evidence is utterly against the abiogenic postulate.

===

Additionally, it's pretty funny seeing you add the "leftist" moniker to my little condemnation of someone shouting down an idea they dislike. How... rightist of you? If it's liberal to use science (since I am a biologist), then call me a bleeding heart commie if you like.

I'll wear that badge with pride, since it appears there are those who show their ignorance with pride.

Re: Kenedy:

I don't see what you're getting at. Are you saying PP.com is biased in that it also supports the theory of gravity too? I dare say you'll have a time convincing me that a website will censor those because it has a bias towards reality. If it was political, yes, but you're only entitled to your own opinions. Not your own facts.

Unless you'd like to prove how something finite can last forever. I'd really like to see that, because that's what the alternative is to peak oil which so few here seem to grasp. The mechanics of how we get there are irrelevant. It WILL run out one way or another, unless you're deluded or 3-years-old.

Kenedy July 3, 2011

It seems that "PetrolPrices.com" are now supporting the "Peak Oil theory" 100% and there's me thinking they were strictly impartial. It wasn't too long ago that they removed old Peakies continual copy/paste propaganda but now they're promoting it with gusto. Talk about running with the fox AND the hounds.

How long before: "This comment has been removed as it was found to be in breach of our Blog Policies" takes the place of the truth?

Moles July 2, 2011

Why such a difference between price of petrol from the same brand ..Sainsburys where I live in worthing 1.34 sainsburys hove 8 miles away 1.31

BP 1.35 here yet few miles away 132.



Tesco 1.33 Tesco hove 1.30
The price should be the same wherever you live


Still being ripped off and still nothing is being done about it!!!

Mitchell June 30, 2011

Peak oil isnt a theory based on observation , nor does it take into account new supply/demand and technological/economical factors that develop. You analogy is ill fitting also, as beer is man made. Many of Hubberts colleague's always said he drew the graph first and selected data that fit. How many times has the peak been revised? CERA recently reported peak oil in 2030? If any other scientific theory had been revised so many times, it would be a laughing stock however "big oil" continue to invest money in "educating" people about peak oil as it suits there cause, higher oil prices.

It doesnt take into account improving shale method extraction, the 3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas under the yukon, Continous deep sea field discoveries, Offshore production is increasing, and the industry may soon be asked to reconsider its basic assumptions about oil. Over the past few decades, a number of industry experts and geologists have conducted research suggesting that the origin of hydrocarbons may be abiogenic, not organic. Stated simply, the abiogenic oil theory posits that oil is not formed from plants and animals compressed for millions of years in sediment rock.
Instead, oil is a primordial substance created before the formation of Earth, and found deep underground

Read about abiogenic petroleum origin theory and the number of top experts in the field of hydrocarbon research flocking to support the theory.

Maybe Kellerman, if you understood the laws of physics you may be able to comment on them however your unscientifically based leftish sarcasm gives of the impression of a complete void between your ears.

Rodders68 June 30, 2011

can anyone explain why diesel at our local morrisons, is 4p dearer than the same store 8 miles away?
seems like a rip off to me.

Kellerman June 30, 2011

Also, LOL at the Greenpeace magazine comment. Did you seriously just state The Economist is a lefty, hippie rag? What're you smoking, and where can I get some?

Kellerman June 30, 2011

How, exactly, does peak oil become an "outdated theory" in any sense of the word when it posits what isn't infinite can run out? When I go to the pub, I tend to find my beer doesn't self-replenish (well, not without heckling the missus/friends), so I'm at a loss to explain why oil is somehow exempt from the laws of physics.

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