Motorists are finding it increasingly hard to give other cars enough room when they park due to modern cars getting wider by a foot on average despite car park spaces remaining the same size as the 1980’s. This leads to frustration among drivers and can result in angry notes being left on windscreens, as well as many bumps and scrapes in tight car park spaces.

However, if parking spaces were made bigger there would be less available car park spaces for drivers to use, which would also cause an inconvenience as there are more cars on the road than ever before, all battling for somewhere to park.

Parking rage in Hertfordshire

The size of parking spaces has been brought into the spotlight recently as an angry motorist took to Facebook to complain about the fact that a note had been left on their car, which described their parking as being “disrespectful”.

The owner of the offending car wrote a response back on Facebook to defend their parking. They went on to say that the reason they had parked off centre was to compensate for the parking of the cars either side of them and suggested that the spaces were too narrow for their Volkswagen Tiguan SUV.

The individual who left the note stated that they had ended up having to access their Volkswagen Golf via the passenger door with great difficulty, as they were unable to get into the vehicle through the driver’s door due to how close the Tiguan was parked to them (see image below). This is one example of parking rage, but it is on the rise. In a recent survey by Yourparkingspace.co.uk, 1 in 10 people admit they have had the threat of physical violence because of their parking.

Parking rage generating high emotions

The RAC Foundation has said that it is unsurprising that motorists are finding it increasingly common that people are parking too close as spaces are getting smaller while cars are getting bigger.

For example, in 1988 a Ford Escort was 5-foot-wide, and the latest model is 6-foot-wide, so drivers of this vehicle will be taking up an extra foot which will make the parking space seem very narrow compared to those driving the slimmer model.

This issue is generating high emotions among drivers which is why notes such as the one left in Hertfordshire are being found by drivers more often than they were before. However, wider car parking spaces would mean there would be less available, which would also cause frustration.

In 2016, car park firm National Car Parks (NCP) widened some parking spaces in London, Manchester and Bournemouth to make them more suitable for larger vehicles, but admitted that it is difficult to strike a balance between having wider bays and maximising the number of available spaces to cope with demand.

Parking spaces in the UK tend to be 15.7ft (4.8m) in length, by 7.8ft (2.4m) in width on average, but many larger cars, such as SUVs now exceed these measurements which make them very difficult to park and an inconvenience to other cars that are parked next to such large vehicles.

Tips for protecting your car in car parks

Unfortunately, smaller spaces and larger cars can result in more accidents occurring in car parks, but there are ways that you can minimise this risk.
• Try parking so that you have a car on one side and a wall or barrier on the other, and then park closest to that wall or barrier and you know that will not cause your car damage, whereas being knocked by a car door will.
• Don’t attempt to park in a space that is too small for your car; you only risk one of the cars on either side of you dinging yours if they are not careful when accessing their vehicle on their return.
• Try to find spaces further away from the entrance of the supermarket, shopping mall, or wherever it is that you are visiting, as people are more likely to park closer for the convenience so you may find that it is quieter further away.
• Don’t park next to a large vehicle because they may have difficulty trying to get out of their space due to their size. If you are a driver of a larger vehicle, consider carefully where you park and try to be considerate about the spacing where possible.

It seems there are no clear answers to the issue; increasing parking space sizes will only mean fewer spaces available. Perhaps the Government needs to consider and investigate ways in which this could be resolved by regulating car parking spaces further while seeking ways to clamp down on parking rage incidents.

Do you drive a larger car and find it a struggle to park? Have you ever been left a note about your parking, or left one for someone else? Let us know in the comments below.

Motorists are finding it increasingly hard to give other cars enough room when they park due to modern cars getting wider by a foot on average despite car park spaces remaining the same size as the 1980’s. This leads to frustration among drivers and can result in angry notes being left on windscreens, as well as many bumps and scrapes in tight car park spaces.

However, if parking spaces were made bigger there would be less available car park spaces for drivers to use, which would also cause an inconvenience as there are more cars on the road than ever before, all battling for somewhere to park.

Parking rage in Hertfordshire

The size of parking spaces has been brought into the spotlight recently as an angry motorist took to Facebook to complain about the fact that a note had been left on their car, which described their parking as being “disrespectful”.

The owner of the offending car wrote a response back on Facebook to defend their parking. They went on to say that the reason they had parked off centre was to compensate for the parking of the cars either side of them and suggested that the spaces were too narrow for their Volkswagen Tiguan SUV.

The individual who left the note stated that they had ended up having to access their Volkswagen Golf via the passenger door with great difficulty, as they were unable to get into the vehicle through the driver’s door due to how close the Tiguan was parked to them (see image below). This is one example of parking rage, but it is on the rise. In a recent survey by Yourparkingspace.co.uk, 1 in 10 people admit they have had the threat of physical violence because of their parking.

Parking rage generating high emotions

The RAC Foundation has said that it is unsurprising that motorists are finding it increasingly common that people are parking too close as spaces are getting smaller while cars are getting bigger.

For example, in 1988 a Ford Escort was 5-foot-wide, and the latest model is 6-foot-wide, so drivers of this vehicle will be taking up an extra foot which will make the parking space seem very narrow compared to those driving the slimmer model.

This issue is generating high emotions among drivers which is why notes such as the one left in Hertfordshire are being found by drivers more often than they were before. However, wider car parking spaces would mean there would be less available, which would also cause frustration.

In 2016, car park firm National Car Parks (NCP) widened some parking spaces in London, Manchester and Bournemouth to make them more suitable for larger vehicles, but admitted that it is difficult to strike a balance between having wider bays and maximising the number of available spaces to cope with demand.

Parking spaces in the UK tend to be 15.7ft (4.8m) in length, by 7.8ft (2.4m) in width on average, but many larger cars, such as SUVs now exceed these measurements which make them very difficult to park and an inconvenience to other cars that are parked next to such large vehicles.

Tips for protecting your car in car parks

Unfortunately, smaller spaces and larger cars can result in more accidents occurring in car parks, but there are ways that you can minimise this risk.
• Try parking so that you have a car on one side and a wall or barrier on the other, and then park closest to that wall or barrier and you know that will not cause your car damage, whereas being knocked by a car door will.
• Don’t attempt to park in a space that is too small for your car; you only risk one of the cars on either side of you dinging yours if they are not careful when accessing their vehicle on their return.
• Try to find spaces further away from the entrance of the supermarket, shopping mall, or wherever it is that you are visiting, as people are more likely to park closer for the convenience so you may find that it is quieter further away.
• Don’t park next to a large vehicle because they may have difficulty trying to get out of their space due to their size. If you are a driver of a larger vehicle, consider carefully where you park and try to be considerate about the spacing where possible.

It seems there are no clear answers to the issue; increasing parking space sizes will only mean fewer spaces available. Perhaps the Government needs to consider and investigate ways in which this could be resolved by regulating car parking spaces further while seeking ways to clamp down on parking rage incidents.

Do you drive a larger car and find it a struggle to park? Have you ever been left a note about your parking, or left one for someone else? Let us know in the comments below.

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